IT Management Slideshow: Is Your E-Mail Emotionally Intelligent?

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 01-20-2011
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Are you paying as much attention to your "EQ" score as you are to your IQ score? A high emotional intelligence quotient, or "EQ," is essential for any professional these days, according to the book Emotional Intelligence 2.0 (TalentSmart/Available now). Authors Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves use the results of a survey of more than 500,000 people to demonstrate how a high EQ equates to career success and high compensation. They found that 90 percent of top job performers have high EQ scores, and these high performers earn, on average, $28,000 more per year than their lower-scoring peers. Only 36 percent of professionals are able to identify their emotions as they happen, and 70 percent of professionals cannot effectively handle stress or conflict. Given that 83 percent of today's workforce considers E-mail to be critical to their success and productivity (more so than phone calls or audio conferences) our emotional shortcomings become glaring when we communicate without the added human benefits of body language, facial expression and tone of voice. Bradberry and Greaves are co-founders of TalentSmart, which provides tools/training to develop the talents of professionals at more than 75 percent of the Fortune 500 companies. Clients have included HP, Microsoft, Ernst and Young, Oracle, Capital One, GE, Nike and the U.S. Senate. Use these highlights from their book raise your E-mail EQ.

Is Your E-Mail Emotionally Intelligent?

* Ten tips for increasing your E-mail EQ 1. Never press "send" in anger. Writing an angry e-mail is fine. But store it, don't send it right away. Cool off first, re-read it and edit it if necessary when you're in a calm frame of mind. Then decide whether or not it should even be sent.
Is Your E-Mail Emotionally Intelligent?
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.
 
 
 

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