IT Management Slideshow: Microsoft's Brain Drain: Key Employee Losses

By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 02-11-2011
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If many of those who left Microsoft the past year or two all banded together to form a single entity, it would be enough to scare the living daylights out of many a startup or even some established companies. Microsoft has see major major departures throughout its ranks -- from C-level executives to middle managers to evangelists and strategic engineers and architects. Throughout 2010, there were several key departures, and the brain drain spilled over into this year, with some big names leaving in January. Perhaps the highest-profile departure was Ray Ozzie, chief software architect of the company. The question for any organization facing such turnover is: How do you retain knowledge when top tech talent departs? The question will become even more pressing as we face a potential IT retirement crisis over the next decade. That said, Microsoft has a deep pool of talent to draw from. Moreover, as veterans hit the door, significant new hires find their way in. In any event, the list in this slide show is by no means exhaustive; there have been several others to leave Microsoft's ranks. But we thought this was at least representative of the talent to leave the software giant in recent memory.

Ray Ozzie

Ray Ozzie, hand-picked by Microsoft founder Bill Gates and CEO Steve Ballmer to head up the overall technological plan for Microsoftís product divisions, Ozzie joined the company in 2005 when Microsoft acquired the company he founded, Groove Networks. Ozzie, who left in October 2010, became chief software architect in 2006, assuming the role Gates had held. His legacy is the Windows Azure cloud platform and FUSE Labs, among a host of other initiatives. Ozzie led Microsoftís overall move to cloud computing.ART: http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/exec/ozzie/

Ray Ozzie
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 

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