CIOs and Their Salaries

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 07-14-2016 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    CIOs and Their Salaries
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    CIOs and Their Salaries

    These CIOs bring in seven-figure salaries as they lead their companies in an era when tech and business units must emerge as collaborative partners.
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    Adriana
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    Adriana "Andi" Karaboutis

    Company: Biogen. Total salary: $7.7 million. Previously CIO at Dell, Karaboutis joined Biogen to advance the company's use of IT solutions—including wearable tech—to improve engagement with patients and health-care providers.
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    Julie Bushman
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    Julie Bushman

    Company: 3M. Total salary: $6 million. With more than three decades of experience at 3M, Bushman was among the original group of leaders who launched Six Sigma at the company. She also oversaw 3M's United Way giving campaign for two years.
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    Martin Lippert
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    Martin Lippert

    Company: MetLife. Total salary: $5.3 million. With a rich history of tech leadership within the finance industry (he was once the chief operations and technology officer for Citigroup), Lippert served as a special advisor to the board of Freddie Mac during the most recent financial crisis, a.k.a. "Great Recession."
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    Deb Butler
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    Deb Butler

    Company: Norfolk Southern. Total salary: $5.1 million. Butler announced her retirement last year. She joined Norfolk Southern in 1978 as a customer account auditor.
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    Rob Carter
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    Rob Carter

    Company: FedEx. Total salary: $4.9 million. Carter has described his company's cloud-first IT transformation as the "Four Horsemen of Dominant Design."
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    Martha Poulter
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    Martha Poulter

    Company: Starwood Hotels. Total salary: $4.6 million. Poulter has led initiatives focused on the ever-increasingly mobile travel consumer. "We're just at that tipping point where we see our mobile (channels) visits surpassing our Web-based visits," she said during an interview, "and so it really speaks to us loudly that it is a critical method that our customers want to use to engage with us."
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    Mark Carges
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    Mark Carges

    Company: eBay. Total salary: $4.5 million. Carges was one of the original architects of Tuxedo for AT&T Bell Laboratories, Unix System Laboratories and Novell, and co-authored the book, The Tuxedo System, Software for Constructing and Managing Distributed Business Applications.
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    Meg McCarthy
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    Meg McCarthy

    Company: Aetna. Total salary: $4.3 million. McCarthy served in the military with the U.S. Navy Medical Services Corp., and reached the position of lieutenant commander with the U.S. Navy Reserves.
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    Matt Carey
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    Matt Carey

    Company: Home Depot. Total salary: $3.6 million. Carey and his team designed and launched a groundbreaking phone/walkie-talkie mobile device called "First Phone," which is capable of performing tasks related to mobile checkout, inventory management, product search and business analytics.
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    Don Imholz
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    Don Imholz

    Company: Centene. Total salary: $3.2 million. Imholz left Centene last year to launch a consultancy. While vice president of IT for Boeing, he oversaw the Boeing Integrated Defense Systems (IDS) Business Unit, which was the company's largest business unit.
 

As a CIO, you probably consider yourself well-compensated. (Or at least we hope so.) But have you ever wondered what the elite of the elite make? If so, you'll want to check out this list of the 10 highest-paid CIOs, as recently published by Janco. Gender-wise, it's a pretty diverse list, with women accounting for half of the positions—including the top two slots and three of the top five. The CIOs also bring to the table a diversity of work and life experiences, including those related to community outreach, national policy, business leadership, tech design and the military. Collectively, they are leading their companies in an era when tech and business units must emerge as collaborative partners, navigating disruptive trends related to the cloud, mobility, Internet of things and even wearable tech. Indeed, one CIO describes this period as a "tipping point" and another in even more apocalyptic terms. In other words, these CIOs are probably earning their lofty paychecks. Janco compiled the list based upon SEC filings. Because of the dated nature of some of these filings, several CIOs on the list are no longer working for the associated companies here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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