The Three Attitudes of a Disciplined IT Department

By Charles Araujo  |  Posted 04-03-2014 Print Email

To be trusted, IT organizations should focus on the customer experience, communicate proactively and effectively, and choose adaptability over rigor.

Woman, leadership

Because our team was unrelentingly focused on serving the customer and in protecting the customer experience, we understood that the process itself was only useful to the point that it helped us best-serve the customer. The moment the process got in the way of that, we skipped it until we could reevaluate the process and make it work for the customer again. While I don’t know that we ever said it explicitly, we had created a culture that valued and recognized adaptability over rigidity—and that lead to massive amounts of trust in our organization.

What Our Customers Want

Our customers want us to deliver services on a consistent and reliable basis. Yet, we must also understand that their expectations are often not as high as we think. We must recognize that, ultimately, our overriding goal is to create trust. And to earn that trust, we must be focused on our customers' experience and expectations. It is only after we create an engrained and steady sense of trust that we will have earned the right to be a member of the group that has a seat at the table—and be able to help drive the organization into the digital future. 

About the Author

Charles Araujo is a recovering consultant and accidental author of the book, The Quantum Age of IT: Why Everything You Know About IT is About to Change. He is an internationally recognized authority on IT Leadership and liberally shares his message of hope about the future of IT and what it means for all of us. He is the founder and CEO of the IT Transformation Institute and serves on the boards of itSMF USA and the Executive Next Practices Institute. You can follow him at @charlesaraujo.


Editor's note: This is the fifth installment of an eight-part article series titled "Seven Steps to a Next-Generation IT Organization." To read the fourth installment, "Building a True Learning Organization," click here.



 

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