How Games Can Drive Employee Achievement

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 06-25-2013
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The “games people play” these days are often launched by CIOs and other senior executives as gamification is emerging as a viable business trend. For external purposes, the concept may produce outcomes such as greater brand visibility and customer loyalty. Internally, it's capable of motivating employees to new levels of performance. A recent report from APQC, Gamification in Knowledge Management: How It Works and What Your Organization Should Know, primarily focuses on the latter, internal side of the topic, incorporating research based on game initiatives launched by companies such as Intel and Accenture. For the purposes of the report, gamification is defined as the use of game mechanics and psychology to drive a specific set of desired behaviors with a target audience. Which means you deploy an app or strategy that allows members of this audience (employees in this case) to win something by doing what you want them to do, like bring in new customers, increase sales and implement better cost-savings. The concept is catching on; more than 70 percent of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified app by 2014, according to Gartner. However, four of five current gamified apps will fail to meet business objectives by 2014, mainly because of poor design, Gartner reports. The stakes will remain high, as 25 percent of redesigned business processes will incorporate gamification by 2015, according to research published by Deloitte University Press. The following is a selected list of best practices as recommended within APQC's report. APQC is a nonprofit that seeks to advance benchmarking and best practices for business strategies. For more about the report, click here

Keep It Simple  If participants strain too hard to understand the game, they could drop out. Remember: If you have to explain it in any kind of depth, it's too complicated.

How Games Can Drive Employee Achievement
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.
 
 
 

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