How to Win Over Hot Job Candidates

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 05-05-2014 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In the recent past, we've reported on how intense the talent wars are getting for top IT professionals: Nearly one-third of companies plan to increase their tech department's staffing this year, compared to one-fifth of organizations which intended to do so in 2010, according to industry research. Among the top skills sought: programming and application development, help desk and tech support, network operations, mobile applications and device management, project management, business analytics, security and cloud computing. Clearly, the competition will only increase in recruiting promising candidates to fill these roles. All of this means that traditional cultural dynamics of the job interview are shifting dramatically. Employers can no longer assume they have the upper hand as many talented IT pros realize they're in the driver's seat. And guess what? You need to do more than just toss a bunch of money and great benefits at hot job prospects to land them. With this in mind, consider the following 10 best practices for recruiting, as provided by Janco Associates. They cover everything from preparation to interviews to post-interview follow-ups. And there's a simple yet effective, underlying message within all of these tips: Make candidates feel wanted—and treat them like you'd like to be treated. For more about Janco's recruitment best practices, click here.

 
 
 
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Produce a Complete and Accurate Job Description

    If the position doesn't clearly state the full range of duties and objectives, prospects may look elsewhere due to uncertainty over expectations.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Produce a Complete and Accurate Job Description
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Provide Job Description in Advance

    So interviewees can directly describe how they can satisfy the various requirements.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Provide Job Description in Advance
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Do Your Homework

    Review LinkedIn and other online resources to find out who the candidates are—and craft questions that specifically reference their bios.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Do Your Homework
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Give a Pre-Interview Itinerary

    This should include when and where the interviews will take place, how long they'll last and who (with titles) will be taking part. If a test is involved, give a heads-up about that, too.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Give a Pre-Interview Itinerary
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Make a Great First Impression

    Make sure the receptionist greets candidates warmly. Encourage employees to make a point of smiling and saying "hello" to the candidate.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Make a Great First Impression
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Be Prompt

    It's unprofessional to make candidates wait beyond scheduled interview start times—and it casts negative light upon your company culture.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Be Prompt
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Allow No Interruptions

    Turn off the cell phone and e-mail notifications. Put your office line on "Do Not Disturb." Don't let a computer screen stand between you and the candidate. Focus entirely on the discussion.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Allow No Interruptions
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Have Materials Ready for the Handoff

    If interviewees receive company materials before leaving, they may well conclude that their time really mattered to you and the department.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Have Materials Ready for the Handoff
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Display Your Company Colors

    Speak about your department and organization's purpose and accomplishments with pride. Talented professionals are motivated by the intrinsic value of the employer and the associated work.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Display Your Company Colors
  • Recruiting Best Practices: Always Close With a Next Steps Summary

    Candidates don't want to be left in limbo. Explain what will happen next and when. Don't drag in making a decision or, if needed, scheduling a follow-up interview.
    Recruiting Best Practices: Always Close With a Next Steps Summary
 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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