The Big Data Disconnect Between IT and Business

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 10-24-2014 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    The ROI for Big Data Dollars
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    The ROI for Big Data Dollars

    According to Wikibon's 2013 Big Data Analytics Survey, respondents, on average, realized only $.55 in return for every dollar invested. They ultimately expect to realize a return of $3.50 per dollar invested over the next 3 to 5 years.
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    Success Ratings for Big Data Investments
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    Success Ratings for Big Data Investments

    On the IT side, 54% reported complete success. On the business side, only 18% feel the same way.
  • Previous
    Reason for IT-Business Disconnect
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    Reason for IT-Business Disconnect

    What accounts for the gap in perceived success between IT and business? They have different criteria for success.
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    IT's Criteria for Big Data Success
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    IT's Criteria for Big Data Success

    For IT departments, the goal is to get the technology installed, deployed, fault tolerant, and up and running.
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    The Business Side's Goal for Big Data
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    The Business Side's Goal for Big Data

    Whether the software is Hadoop, a relational database, or something else doesn't really matter to the business side. It wants answers to questions and insights from all that data to identify new markets, improve customer service, solve business problems and so on.
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    Hadoop's Impact on Traditional Data Warehouse World
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    Hadoop's Impact on Traditional Data Warehouse World

    Asked whether they have shifted a workload from a mainframe or traditional data warehouse to Hadoop, 61% of respondents said they had. That figure is expected to increase dramatically over the next 3 to 5 years.
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    Is the Balance of Database Power Changing?
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    Is the Balance of Database Power Changing?

    The balance of power between Hadoop, traditional data warehouses and relational databases is starting to shift, according to the Wikibon study. "EDW [enterprise data warehouse] is no longer the center of the universe," says Jeffrey Kelly.
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    Types of Workloads Being Shifted
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    Types of Workloads Being Shifted

    The main kinds of workloads being shifted are data transformations. Companies must normalize data from transaction and financial systems, for example, so that they are in the same format and then analytics can be performed, possibly at one-tenth the cost.
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    Big Data Will Affect Most Businesses
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    Big Data Will Affect Most Businesses

    All industries will be in the data business one way or another, whether they know it or not. John Deere, for example, is equipping tractors with sensors and analytics capabilities to help farmers understand what crops to plant and when and where.
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    A Big Data Skills Gap
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    A Big Data Skills Gap

    Hadoop, a 10-year-old open source framework originally developed to support distribution for a search engine project, is relatively complex. "There are not a lot of IT personnel who understand it and how to use it,” Jeffrey Kelly says. "The skill gap is a big one."
 

A disconnect between the business and IT sides of enterprise may cause big data not live up to expectations, according to a new survey by Wikibon. Besides the IT department's focus on installing and maintaining systems to crunch Big Data, there should be a business conversation about how it can provide actionable solutions, the survey says. The study, "Big Data Analytics Survey, 2014," conducted by John Kelly, David Floyer, and Ralph Finos, surveyed 300 executives. Twenty percent work at technology providers, 15 percent in healthcare, 15 percent in manufacturing, 9 percent in banking and finance, 7 percent were in retail and wholesale, and the remainder were in other industries. The survey covers big data ROI, Hadoop adoption and other issues. "Many organizations recognize that their data problems are overwhelming their traditional systems, but they haven't thought through the skills required not just to install and maintain these systems, but to actually do the hard science and translate that into actionable insights," says Jeffrey Kelly, a lead analyst for Wikibon, a worldwide community of technologists dedicated to the open sharing of information about improving the adoption of technology and business systems. For more about the survey, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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