Books Slideshow: How to Manage Agile IT Teams

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 02-04-2011

Social complexity

Managing agile teams is enhanced by understanding of the science of social complexity - the study of dynamics created within groups of people.

Social complexity

The big picture

Teams must be internally motivated to pursue agile goals, not by extrinsic rewards. Agile goals should be focused on organization-wide benefits, not a single special interest.

The big picture

The right team

Your agile team members must have excellent motivation, time-management skills and attention to detail.

The right team

Timely feedback

Timely feedback for agile teams is critical. The less you delay praise/constructive criticism of a task, the better you reinforce your vision.

Timely feedback

Everybody matters

Teams must be self-initiating and collaborative - collocation preferred - with roles defined/assigned so no person is considered just another replaceable cog in the machine.

Everybody matters

Include customers

Agile development requires involvement and/or collaboration with customers throughout the entire project cycle.

Include customers

Creative tension

Positive conflict - meaning internal tension that sparks debate, competition, creativity within teams - is a driving force of agile management.

Creative tension

Multiple points of view

Diversity of all parties involved can ensure a robust, multi-perspective POV of the project needs and capabilities.

Multiple points of view

The right tools

Adequate tools must be available for daily builds, integration and automated testing. Automation must also serve as substitute for repetitious activity performed manually. Tools that radiate information (burn charts, big-task boards) are highly effective.

The right tools

Positive risk-taking

Encourage an environment in which team members feel free to propose ideas and take risks without fear of facing professional consequences should things go awry.

Positive risk-taking