IT Management Slideshow: 11 Elements of Power

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 01-19-2011

Knowledge = power

Knowledge is also class-agnostic—anyone can get it if they have the determination and savvy to do so.

Knowledge = power

Focus on knowledge that differentiates you.

The unique quality of your knowledge that makes you distinctly powerful—not the ability to command a large quantity of useless facts.

Focus on knowledge that differentiates you.

Articulation and eloquence exude power.

Effective speakers use strong images and results-based examples to capture audiences.

Articulation and eloquence exude power.

Articulation and eloquence matter whenever you communicate.

It's not only about how you perform in public speaking scenarios. Articulation and eloquence matter in meetings large and small, in casual conversation, in formal memos and in day-to-day e-mails and text messages.

Articulation and eloquence matter whenever you communicate.

Capacity to lead is directly tied to the strength of your relationships.

These strengths are often based upon reciprocal relationships. For you to influence others, you must demonstrate a receptiveness to be influenced by them.

Capacity to lead is directly tied to the strength of your relationships.

Like anything worthwhile, relationships need the investment of time.

Make demands too quickly and the relationship will sour. Instead, let it grow over months, years through repeated acts of professional/personal commitment.

Like anything worthwhile, relationships need the investment of time.

Character counts.

With it, employees, peers and senior execs will trust your intentions.

Character counts.

Relying solely on negative motivators will eventually diminish your power.

Constantly threatening "consequences" with no rewards will inspire your teams to plot against you.

Relying solely on negative motivators will eventually diminish your power.

Confidence creates a positive impression.

Confidence makes a leader appear in control and in charge—even when he or she is internally uncertain.

Confidence creates a positive impression.

Physical appearance matters.

You don't need to be George Clooney or Julia Roberts. But, always appear well-groomed, and use posture and eye-contact that says: Leader. (Staying fit helps too.)

Physical appearance matters.

Evaluate your turnover rate.

Employees vote with their feet if they sense that staying in your department is a dead-end path because you lack power in the organization.

Evaluate your turnover rate.