IT Management Slideshow: CES 2012: 10 New Products Every CIO Should Fear

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 01-12-2012

LG Spectrum

The LG Spectrum is the company's flagship smartphone, and the device that it hopes can help it compete against iPhone. The worry for CIOs? The device will ship with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread), and then be upgradeable to Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich). And as you know all too well, Android is risky for the enterprise.

LG Spectrum

Viewsonic ViewPad E70

This tablet is designed to take on the low-priced slates on the market, such as Amazon's Kindle Fire. The ViewPad comes with a 7-inch display, Android 4.0, and a $179.99 price tag. However, it could also be a potential security concern in your office, since it's running Android and doesn't come with the enterprise-focused security features you're undoubtedly after.

Viewsonic ViewPad E70

HTC Titan 2

HTC released the Titan smartphone last year. This time around, the company showed off the Titan 2, featuring 16-megapixel camera, 1.5GHz Snapdragon S2 processor, and 4.7-inch screen. Nifty for consumers. But until you try it out and make sure it holds up to the rigors of enterprise security, it's best to keep it out of the office.

HTC Titan 2

Samsung Galaxy Note

Initially announced in late 2011, the device, which works with a stylus, was given full attention at CES. It comes with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) -- the top concern -- and seems far too consumer-focused for any product you'd want in the office.

Samsung Galaxy Note

Sony Xperia S

Sony is getting serious about a multiscreen viewing experience, now that it has taken control over Sony Ericsson. The Xperia S is arguably one of the most prominent smartphones on display at CES. The device comes with a 4.3-inch HD display, a 1.5GHz dual-core processor, and all kinds of other goodies. If this catches on, you'll want to be ready to respond to employees looking to use it at work.

Sony Xperia S

Pick An Ultrabook

Ultrabooks were hot at CES, so you'll want to prepare for how you'll handle their eventual arrival at your office. They might actually be useful for some of your employees, but you'll need to fully investigate their security options first. Do it fast, because your workers will surely want to start bringing these lightweight notebooks to the office.

Pick An Ultrabook

Ice Cream Sandwich Party

Ice Cream Sandwich is the latest Android operating system for smartphones and tablets. CIOs beware: Ice Cream Sandwich hasn't been put through its security paces just yet.

Ice Cream Sandwich Party

Sony Walkman Z

This is the electronics company's latest attempt to take on Apple's iPod, using the Android operating system, of course. As with an iPod, this gadget can do far more than provide distracting entertainment: Its storage capacity can easily accommodate any manner of sensitive information, and it offers full access to the Android app market.

Sony Walkman Z

Kinect For Windows

Microsoft is making its Kinect motion-gaming peripheral available for the PC. Will employees want to bring it to the office to video chat with friends? Will they use it to waste work hours playing games? At this point, a strict No-Kinect policy is a probably a good idea.

Kinect For Windows

Motorola Droid 4

This smartphone, like its predecessors, comes with a slide-out keyboard and a touch screen. It'll also be launching with Android 2.3.5 (Gingerbread), though it's upgradeable to Android 4.0. On paper, the Droid 4 looks to be more enterprise-focused than its competitors at CES, but until it comes with all the security features you're are after, you'll want to think twice about this device.

Motorola Droid 4