IT Management Slideshow: Leadership Realities You Won't Learn in Management School

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 11-18-2010

All managers have flaws.

Leaders who can win over employees, superiors or customers despite their failings are the ones who succeed. First step: Identify your own faults to minimize negative impact.

All managers have flaws.

Your best information is not always the result of a systemic, data-driven process.

Face-to-face conversations, phone chats, e-mail/text exchanges all provide insight needed to supplement data.

Your best information is not always the result of a systemic, data-driven process.

Great managers do not always have everything “under control.”

Even so, they don't fear unanticipated change, nor do they allow themselves to get rattled by it.

Great managers do not always have everything “under control.”

You don’t need a clear understanding of everything your employees do.

Jack Welch once joked, "If you're not confused, you don't know what's going on." It's more important to know that your staffers can take ownership of their individual tasks.

You don’t need a clear understanding of everything your employees do.

Dont “present” information. Deliver it.

Long presentations, marathon conferences and the like are a time-consuming crutch. Streamline information delivery whenever possible.

Dont “present” information. Deliver it.

You dont have to be “supreme leader.”

There are no "single leaders" really. There's only leadership. Cultivate this quality within your IT teams.

You dont have to be “supreme leader.”

Education isnt everything.

There are all kinds of reasons why a prospective employee didn't graduate from the best college - or graduate at all. Remember, Bill Gates, Mike Dell and Steve Jobs all dropped out.

Education isnt everything.

Dont populate your office with superstars.

Superstars have value. So do the middle-of-packers who are ready/willing to take on the grunt work that the stars avoid.

Dont populate your office with superstars.

Talladega Nights got it wrong: If you aint first, youre not necessarily last.

You sure don't want to be "first" to pilot a system upgrade that fails, do you? Best to adapt tools that have a proven track record.

Talladega Nights got it wrong: If you aint first, youre not necessarily last.

Work and private life neednt be entirely separate.

When a senior manager and team members interact and share off-work experiences, it builds bonds that can lead to better quality of work.

Work and private life neednt be entirely separate.

Minimize your maxims.

God only needed 10. You're better off with seven if you want them to stick.

Minimize your maxims.