IT Management Slideshow: Not Office Safe: Ten Products To Keep Out of the Workplace

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 01-04-2012

Amazon Kindle Fire

The Amazon Kindle Fire is a fine consumer tablet, but as an enterprise-focused product, it falls short. The device lacks the kind of security you're after, and it comes with too many consumer-facing services built-in. Keep it at home.

Amazon Kindle Fire

Netflix

Netflix is a great home entertainment resource but at work it's a pure productivity drain. Block access in the office, so employees keep doing what they should be doing -- working.

Netflix

Facebook

As much as you'd love to ban it, this horse is probably already out of the barn. Besides, your marketing department would howl if you tried to limit access. All you can do at this point is set use policies, monitor network activity and hope that someone doesn't click on a malicious link that puts your data or network at risk.

Facebook

Twitter

As with Facebook, Twitter is another social network that is probably unstoppable at this point. Twitter is loaded with potential security threats. It's best to acknowledge that (and safeguard against it). Most importantly, educate your users before you encounter major trouble.

Twitter

Unauthorized Mobile Apps

Set use policies so that employees understand what mobile apps are authorized (expense reporting apps), and which are not sanctioned (games). . On Android devices, especially, mobile apps can present a potential security threat.

Unauthorized Mobile Apps

Macs

Riding the coattails of iPhones and iPads, Macs are popular with consumers and boast incredible ease-of-use. While they've been in the enterprise particularly in creative sectors such as publishing and the arts for over a decade, Macs are now entering other enterprise sectors. The problem? They're costly, and many common enterprise programs are not yet Mac-friendly.

Macs

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

Originally touted as the best alternative to the iPad 2, the device falls short for the enterprise. For one thing, it's running Android, which brings with it certain security risks. Add that to its high price and derivative design, and it seems that it's best to keep this tablet out of the office for now.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

RIM BlackBerry PlayBook

BlackBerry PlayBook is designed for enterprise users. Yet, the device lacks native e-mail and messaging applications and comes with a small 7-inch display. What's worse, it has more consumer-focused features that most CIOs would like to see.

RIM BlackBerry PlayBook

Netbooks

Netbooks were once all the rage in the enterprise. But since tablets became popular and more companies warmed to the idea of adopting the iPad, all that has changed. Netbooks are laptop and tablet wannabes. And for most employees, they're useless.

Netbooks

Android

Android is a consumer operating system. Period. Although companies such as Cisco and Motorola have tried to make Android an enterprise favorite, they have failed. The operating system is a security nightmare, lacks the ease-of-use found in iOS, and is running on somewhat unreliable devices. Android should have no place in the office.

Android