IT Management Slideshow: Lundquist: Back to School Lessons For CIOs

By Eric Lundquist  |  Posted 09-10-2010

Lundquist: Back to School Lessons For CIOs

1. Don't skip school. Education and ongoing learning are often championed but less often funded in corporations. Make sure your staff (and you) are not scrimping on learning about the tools you will need and the skills required to make your company a competitive success.

Lundquist: Back to School Lessons For CIOs

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2. Skip school. Some of the most important technology and business trends are being learned outside the confines of the classroom. If you want to learn about location-aware applications, federated security and - of course - all those social networks, become a user. These technologies not yet on the standard school curriculum.

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3. Get out of the office. What if your company decided to build the entire workforce around the idea of mobility? The mobile Internet is one of the hottest topics in tech. How should you organize and equip a company with mobility in mind from the start? The best education here is to treat yourself as a mobile employee and see what resources are and aren't available to you.

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4.Brush up on social networking math. FaceBook, LinkedIn, Twitter and on and on. How is your company going to measure the value of all the social networks coming into your company? Are you providing the measurement tools to let your peers know what is and what isn't working?

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5. Get a secure education. Security is still job one. How much time do you spend learning about the new tricks and hacks that the bad guys are developing to break into your company's networks? You need to stay up to speed on the how the hackers want to mess up your life.

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6. Educate yourself on cloud identification. If the Mobile Internet is hot, cloud computing is even hotter. You need to be able to talk public clouds, private clouds, federated clouds and why your company needs to have a cloud computing strategy. It's time to master this subject.

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7. Get your business degree. Build a bridge between the techies and the business execs. What are your company's business priorities? Are your major tech investments aimed at supporting your company's major business strategies? Or has technology investment strayed from the new business priorities?

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8. Learn from the Millennials. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, all those employees with iPhones, Androids, iPads, tablets, location-awareness, social networks and more are the future of technology. The devices raise real business issues for you, but these workers can also teach you a lot about where consumers and customers are going to be conducting their business. Buy them lunch and learn how these employees live in today's techie environment.

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9. Learn to count beans. Business is still about dollars coming in and going out. How do you measure your technology investments? What is the ROI? Are you buying or leasing? Do you buy software or lease services? Learn how to evaluate and justify new technology initiatives.

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10. Learn to be a customer. What is it like to do business with your company? Take time to understand the entry points and obstacles customers face in doing business with your company. Easing the friction of customer and company interaction through the intelligent application of technology may be your most important contribution.

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