Leadership Slideshow: CIO in the Clutch: How to Excel Under Stress

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 08-11-2010

Learn from sports legends

Joe Montana engineered countless, last-minute comebacks with calm-under-pressure, "ice water in the veins" resolve. CIOs need the same qualities.

Learn from sports legends

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

1. Understanding that "focus" isn't "concentration." Anyone can concentrate. Focus requires a clear vision for an effective organization.

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

2. Preparing relentlessly to achieve focus. There are no shortcuts when it comes to obtaining and understanding good information.

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

3. Practicing discipline to the point where it becomes a given, not a goal.

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

4. Always anticipating and responding. Have a plan for market changes before they happen.

Four secrets of "clutch" leaders:

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

1. Overconfidence. "Clutch" managers know good times give way to challenging ones. They learn as much from struggle as they do from success.

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

2. Underconfidence. On the other hand, feeling internal pessimism/anxiety will eventually show, leading your IT teams to doubt the mission.

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

3. Overthinking. Not to be confused with over-preparing, overthinking stops you from trusting your experience and instincts, preventing you from making clear-headed decisions.

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

4. Hubris. The classic downfall of tragic heroes remains in abundance. Blind arrogance is destructive to all in its path.

Four Reasons Managers "Choke" in the "Clutch"?

What can CIOs learn from great athletes?

Athletes are confronted with countermoves from opponents, expectations of fans. CIOs, likewise, must anticipate competitors' strategies as well as demands from customers.

What can CIOs learn from great athletes?

What can CIOs learn from great athletes?

Athletes simulate "pressure" moments when they practice. CIOs, likewise, must constantly consider and plan for "what if?" crises.

What can CIOs learn from great athletes?