Mobile & Wireless Slideshow: 10 Reasons CIOs Should Hate the iPad 2

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 07-08-2011

Where's the Flash Support?

When users want to surf the Web, they might not be able to see all the sites they would on their Windows machines because iPad doesn't support the widely used Adobe Flash platform. Considering how many sites and applications require Flash, the platform is a necessity in the corporate world.

Where's the Flash Support?

It’s Focused On Consumers

iPad2 is arguably the most attractive product on store shelves for consumers. With consumer functionality comes distracted employees who aren't working. And that is simply unacceptable in today's corporate world.

It’s Focused On Consumers

A Productivity Drain?

If employees are using the iPad 2 to access entertainment, play games they downloaded from the App Store, or watch Netflix movies, then they aren't working. It might sound rather Draconian, but you may need to give employees a device that is decidedly enterprise-focused, and thus, not so tempting for consumer exploits.

A Productivity Drain?

Oh, You’ll Pay for 3G

Pricing for iPad 2 starts at $629 for the cheapest Wi-Fi-and-3G version of the tablet, Consider that you'll also need to pay for that mobile connectivity each month. Data fees add up quickly. The spending doesn't end when you purchase the device.

Oh, You’ll Pay for 3G

Accessorizing

Beyond 3G, you'll also need to think seriously about getting accessories for the iPad 2. The tablet boasts a big, 9.7-inch touchscreen that will probably need a physical keyboard add-on for employees who need to get real work done. And, if you want to keep the tablet safe, you'll need a case. Simply put, accessorizing the iPad 2 will be costly.

Accessorizing

High TCO

Beware the total cost of ownership on the iPad 2. As mentioned, the cheapest option retails for $629, and costs only go up from there. You can buy a netbook for a few hundred dollars or a nice Lenovo laptop for around the same price as the cheapest 3G-equipped iPad 2.

High TCO

Training Is An Issue

Apple's iPad 2 is arguably one of the more intuitive devices on store shelves. However, you'll still need to train employees on how to use the tablet, since it features touch functionality that some folks just aren't used to. Combine that with the fact that it's running iOS, a platform many PC-based employees have never used, and training might be more trouble than it's worth.

Training Is An Issue

Windows Is Better for Compatibility

If you have several applications that are absolutely necessary for your company's continued operation, remember that Apple's iPad 2 is runs on the iOS platform. The vast majority of enterprise-focused programs do not support that operating system. If you're looking for software-compatibility, don't waste your time on the iPad 2.

Windows Is Better for Compatibility

The BlackBerry PlayBook?

There are several tablets options on store shelves. One such device, the RIM BlackBerry PlayBook, is arguably the most enterprise-focused of the lot, thanks to its support for BlackBerry Enterprise Server and its superior security features.

The BlackBerry PlayBook?

It May Be Old News Soon

Keep in mind that rumors abound about an iPad 3 launch in fall 2011 or, at the latest, early next year. At this point, it might be best to wait for the next iteration.

It May Be Old News Soon