IT: Getting Ready to Fight the Next War

By CIOinsight  |  Posted 09-13-2006
On the fifth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, eWEEK sought the perspective of several members of our Corporate Partner Advisory Board as they looked back at the disruptive forces that have reshaped the enterprise agenda during that time.

Technology Editor Peter Coffee spoke with Robert Rosen, CIO of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, in Bethesda, Md.; Kevin Wilson, product line manager, desktop and mobile, Duke Energy, in Charlotte, N.C.; and Judy Brown, strategic adviser, University of Wisconsin System, in Madison, Wis.

Our goal today is to look at the adjustments that enterprise IT has been forced to make in the time since the 9/11 attacks. How has 9/11 affected IT operationally? Is there more demand for support for teleconferencing or other remote collaboration because of the greater nuisance of travel? Is there more proactive investment in information security or a growing role of IT in physical security? And has there been any change in the posture as to resource availability for any new roles?

Rosen: What has happened, I think, for the most part, is that people are much more aware of the need for disaster recovery and continuity-of-operations plans. They're clearly spending more time making sure that they're doing these things, doing a lot more inspection and so on. The downside of it is, for most people, there's no additional funding available. We have to be ingenious about doing these things along with everything else.

Read the full story on eWEEK.com: IT: Getting Ready to Fight the Next War