Women`s Salary Deficit Less in IT

By Deborah Perelman  |  Posted 04-28-2008

Statistically, men make more money than women for doing the same job. It's called the "wage gap" and it is considered one of the last bastions of gender inequality in the workplace.

The wage gap hit its all-time low in 1973, when women could be expected to earn 56.6 percent of what a man would earn for the same work, according to the U.S. Women's Bureau and the National Committee on Pay Equity. This was a decade after the Equal Pay Act, signed in 1963, made it illegal for employers to pay unequal wages to men and women who held the same job and did the same work. (The percentage was 58 percent in 1963.)

In 2007, women could expect to be paid 80 cents on the dollar across all occupations, an improvement of less than half a penny per year, with numbers even further depressed among minorities: 64 cents for African-American women and 52 cents for Hispanic women. But IT fared much better than most in 2007.

Read the full story: Wage Gap Narrower for Women in IT