Security Slideshow: Cyber Crime Trends Report: Grim News for Q1 2011

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 05-17-2011

12 percent

The number of phishing attacks was up 12 percent in 1Q 2011 compared with the same period a year ago.

12 percent

DNSSEC

On March 31, 2011, Verisign signed the .com root zone for Domain Name Service Security Extensions (DNSSEC), continuing a global move toward DNSSEC implementation within the DNS layer.

DNSSEC

Complex Proposition

In the application layer, timetables for complete DNSSEC implementation are still to be determined. With the wide variety of open standards and proprietary technologies in play in hundreds of DNS-aware applications, DNSSEC implementation in this layer will be complex and will require close coordination between IT Security, DNS Administration, and Vendor Management.

Complex Proposition

Lack of IT Awareness

Fully half of internal and external IT personnel in charge of Internet security within their respective organizations say they have little or no knowledge of DNSSEC, according to a survey conducted by IID in coordination with the Online Trust Alliance.

Lack of IT Awareness

5%

Only 5 percent of survey respondents say that their organizations have implemented DNSSEC.

5%

16%

Only 16 percent of respondents say that they plan to bring DNSSEC to their organizations at some point in the future.

16%

Rustock takedown

When Microsoft and others helped law enforcement take down the Rustock botnet, the amount of spam around the world decreased significantly. The botnet was believed to send out one-third of all spam around the world.

Rustock takedown

Financial phishing

Banks were primary targets of phishing attacks in 1Q 2011. In fact, compared to the 4Q 2010, phishing attacks in the banking sector increased 11 percent. Most attacks were non-U.S.-based.

Financial phishing

Mobile attacks

Many banks continue to see rogue mobile apps used in phishing. In January 2011, Google removed 50 apps from its Android Market. Each app had reportedly been downloaded between 50,000 and 200,000 times.

Mobile attacks