Trends Slideshow: Tech Jargon To Avoid in the C-Suite

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 09-09-2010

Tech Jargon To Avoid in the C-Suite

Hackers This implies that someone is breaking into the network and stealing sensitive data, putting the entire firm at risk right now. Stick with "potential danger." It gets the point across, but sounds much nicer.

Tech Jargon To Avoid in the C-Suite

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Syncing This has become a go-to phrase in the post-iPhone world, but that doesn't mean everyone understands what it's all about. Choose an innocuous alternative, such as "add."

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Cloud Computing Some C-level executives might pretend to understand what this is. Those who don't will ask a litany of questions. Instead, say you want to invest in Internet-based services to help the company improve productivity and save money.

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Virtualization This is integral to the success of a well-run organization, but many business executives have trouble grasping the concept. Instead, demonstrate a virtualized app for them - it's much easier this way.

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Virtual Storage These solutions are helping companies save money all over the world. But the phrase may mean nothing to your CEO. Try saying you want to invest in online storage to save money. That should do the trick.

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Servers and Blades The average CEO might know what a server is, but they'll be lost once you bring blades into the conversation. Best to keep both words out of your discussions.

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Firewall Even mentioning a firewall scares your CEO. Better to say you want to invest in more protection to keep data secure. You'll get your point across without causing alarm.

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Phishing Some CEOs may not know about this, despite all media attention it receives. Explain that without the proper safeguards in place, employees could be roped into scams that could put data at risk.

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Malware This phrase hasn't made its way to the CEO's office just yet. Better to keep it that way. If you're concerned about malware, stick with "virus" and "spyware." It gets the point across without confusing.

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Cloud OS With Google planning Chrome OS and other companies potentially investing in cloud-based operating systems, it's time that you start thinking about these. The Windows-blinded CEO will not care. For now, investigate on your own, and bring it up when the time is right.

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Open Source Firms that are heavily been so invested in closed, legacy programs might not see value in open source That's where you come in. Focus on the benefits, not on the technology, otherwise you'll never get out of this meeting.

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Texting Your e-mail-oriented CEO might not see value in this. Keep that word out of the office and instead share highlight studies that show what young workers are really looking for.

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Instant Messaging Many execs view this as a way for employees to avoid work. Nowadays, that isn't true. Talking about it isn't a good idea, implementing it in the office is. You'll need to frame it as a way for employees to communicate instantly and effectively.

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