Workplace Slideshow: E-mail Tsunami Overtakes Us, Even in the Bedroom

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 09-13-2010

65%

65 percent of U.S. male professionals check work E-mail outside of work hours.

65%

51%

51 percent of U.S. female professionals check work E-mail during non-work hours.

51%

72%

72 percent of Americans who check work E-mail outside of work hours do so while on vacation or on weekends/holidays.

72%

18%

18 percent of U.S. adults say they have a difficult time being productive after returning from a holiday, a sign that they may be doing too much work-related E-mailing when they're supposed to be rejuvenating.

18%

42%

42 percent of Americans who call up E-mails outside of work hours do so on sick days&#151compared to less than 26 percent of British professionals who do so.

42%

27%

27 percent of American professionals check E-mail during off hours because they feel they're expected to provide quick responses to work-related messages.

27%

37%

37 percent of Americans are afraid to go without checking E-mail when outside the office because they're afraid they'll miss something important.

37%

43%

43 percent of Americans say they check E-mail during "off" time because they feel it eases, not increases, their workload.

43%

5%

Just 5 percent of American professionals say they check E-mail outside normal office hours to impress their boss or colleagues.

5%

One in five

Nearly one in five Americans who check work E-mail during off-duty time say they do so in bed&#151either in the morning or before they go to sleep at night.

One in five

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

1. Send calendar reminders to colleagues and close contacts before you plan to be out of the office. Make sure they know you will be unavailable for E-mail correspondence during that period. Stick to this promise.

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

2. If you see three or more E-mails from the same sender with the same subject header, only open the most recent one. It will likely contain the contents of the previous two messages.

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

3. Only reply when a reply is needed. "Reply All" even more judiciously. If you can, use IM to communicate with colleagues; it's often our co-workers who are most guilty of clogging our in-boxes.

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

Four steps to manage E-mail overload:

4. Take the time to learn all the shortcuts your E-mail program has to offer, and use these regularly. Then it's time to read, react if necessary, delete. Repeat.

Four steps to manage E-mail overload: