Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 06-10-2013

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Polarized Thinking  You see everyone as either for or against you, inviting conflict and derision.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Worst-Case Syndrome  You obsess about every bad thing that could happen, which will stall forward progress—and increase your amount of stress.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Not-Good-Enough Syndrome  You conclude that executive peers are superior to you because they went to a better college, earn more money or another relatively irrelevant factor. Remember that you were hired for a reason.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Over-Personalization  You can’t distinguish strategic actions from personal ones. Take a cue from the Corleone family: “It’s strictly business ….”

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Negative Filtering  You receive an evaluation that effusively praises you. However, you dwell on the one remark that was slightly critical.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Self-Centered  You conclude that every statement and action is a reaction to something you did. Instead, think about the dynamics of an organization as a whole.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Conclusion Jumping  Never evaluate a situation or opportunity until you’ve reviewed all of the available evidence.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Control Fallacy  You perceive that you have more control over outcomes than you do. (“If I had worked harder, the project wouldn’t have failed.”) It’s better to recognize limitations, and view failures as learning opportunities.

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers

Reward Fixation  You target personal rewards, such as raises and promotions, and grow resentful when you don’t receive what you think is due to you. Seek fulfillment within the work itself. 

Nine Flaws of Bad Managers