Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 03-05-2013

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Offline Discussion  69% of workers say they prefer sharing positive feedback face-to-face, and 63% say they also prefer discussing negative feedback that way.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Friendly Tools  43% feel e-communication improves workplace relationships, and only 8% say it has a negative impact.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Remote Connections  40% have worked with someone for an extended period and never met them in person or spoken with them on the phone.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Gender Divide  62% of men say e-communication increases productivity, compared to 50% of women.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Generation Gap  65% of workers age 25 to 34 say e-communication increases productivity, as opposed to 52% of workers age 35 or older.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Loose Lips  45% of women say they’d “never” share workplace gossip, compared to just 34% of men.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Constant Contact  While 36% of employees will use a cell phone to contact family while at work, one in five will now text.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age

Peer-to-Peer Engagement  14% admit that they’ve flirted with co-workers via e-mail, texting or IM.

Workers Still Value Personal Touch in Digital Age