Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 11-30-2012

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

It’s All About the Cash
With billions of dollars in cash on hand, it’s hard to see any way that Microsoft will face impending doom anytime soon. After all, the company has enough cash to buy out competitors that might be challenging its empire. And if it can’t develop any parts of its products, it can acquire companies that can.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

There’s No Windows Killer
Although Windows 8 isn’t as popular as Microsoft might like, what’s the big deal? Apple’s OS X is gaining some ground, but it still has a fraction of Windows’ market share. Plus, the enterprise needs Windows. Until those two factors change, there is no such thing as a “Windows Killer.”

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Give Windows 8 Time
Windows 8 has been available for only a month, but it’s already being called a failure. That’s nonsense. Many top Windows 8 consumer PCs aren’t even in store yet. Plus, the enterprise doesn’t plan to deploy Windows 8 PCs for another year. In short, Windows 8 has a long way to go before it can be called a failure.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Surface Is a Good First Try
Microsoft’s Surface tablet is selling modestly, but it’s a good first try. Microsoft needs a presence in the tablet market, and it’s now getting that from its own product. Surface isn’t an iPad, but it’s not a loser, either.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Don’t Discount Nokia
Although Nokia is slipping, the Finnish company is still an incredibly powerful device maker. Luckily for Microsoft, it has decided to play nice with Windows Phone. Nokia is trusted and viewed favorably in Europe and emerging markets around the world. That’s important for Microsoft and Windows Phone.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Let the Google-Motorola Lovefest Play Out
Despite Google saying that its ownership of Motorola won’t affect its relationship with other Android phone vendors, we need to wait and see about that. If Google and Motorola get too cozy, HTC, Samsung and other major vendors might get scared and run to Microsoft.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

What About Office?
Amid all of the discussions about Microsoft’s demise, the one thing that rarely gets mentioned is Office. The productivity suite has been the biggest aspect of Microsoft’s operation for years, and will likely remain so for the foreseeable future. Until a company can topple Office, Microsoft isn’t going away.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Microsoft Leads in The Cloud
The cloud is the next big frontier in the technology industry. Although it’s true Microsoft isn’t dominant in the cloud, it’s not far behind, either. In fact, the company’s cloud solutions, lead by Azure, are leading in some ways. That’s bad news for prognosticators who believe the company will fail sooner than later.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Is Google That Worrisome?
When discussions of Microsoft’s impending doom come up, Google is often cited as the company that could eventually take it down. Is Google such a big threat? Google’s main danger for Microsoft is Android. But even with a dominant share in the mobile space, Google isn’t nearly as dangerous as many people claim.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown

Microsoft Embraces Hardware
For years, Microsoft has sat on the hardware sidelines and delivered only software. By producing the Surface tablet, Microsoft has shined a spotlight on its operating system in the slate market. Other companies are now following its lead. The more products running Windows, the better. And Microsoft knows it.

Why Microsoft's Impending Doom Is Overblown