Did Somebody Say Malware?

By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 07-23-2013

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Malware Rules Globally  66% of companies experienced at least one malware attack in the previous 12 months, according to the survey. The most-frequent targets: South America (72%), Russia (71%), North America (70%), Asia-Pacific (68%), Western Europe (63%).

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Companies Battle Internal and External Security Incidents  During the past year, 91% of the companies reported at least one external IT security incident and 85% reported internal incidents. To minimize risk, 71% have deployed anti-malware solutions and 54% used patches and software updates. Just over half manage the access rights to different areas of their IT infrastructure.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Most Frequent Types of Attacks  91% of organizations reported at least one external attack in the previous 12 months. The five top threats were: Viruses, worms, spyware and other malicious programs (66%)Spam (61%)Phishing (36%)Network infrastructure (24%)Mobile device theft (21%)

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Ouch! Malware is Expensive for Big Guys  A serious incident can cost a large company an average of $649,000. And a successful targeted attack on a large company can cost it $2.4 million in direct financial losses and additional costs.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

…And Smaller Guys Hurt Too  For a medium-size or small company, a targeted attack can mean about $92,000 in damages, which is almost twice as much as an average attack. Small and medium-size companies feel the burn from an average expense of $50,000.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Data Loss is the Worst Consequence of External Attacks  66% of companies lost data due to viruses, worms, spyware and other malicious programs. Of that lost data, 12% was sensitive business data. The second top cause of data loss was phishing (36%).

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Internal Threats are a Problem, Too  The top three internal vulnerabilities: flaws and vulnerabilities in their software (39%)accidental leaks and sharing (32%)lost or stolen mobile devices (30%)

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Mobile Phones: One Ever-Present Problem  Mobile phones cause the biggest source of sensitive business data loss and leakage, according to 38% of respondents. And 95% reported that at least one mobile device-related security incident had been recorded in their company in the past year. Stolen devices are a close second (33%).

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Security Policy and Education Budgets Go Begging  A majority (86%) had security policies in place, but almost half (46%) reported insufficient time and resources to develop and implement them.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Educate Your Staff  Companies also reported problems with staff attitudes toward security policies and their enforcement. Over half said their employees took IT security policies seriously and complied with them. But 38% said employees did not understand why specific IT security policies had been implemented.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

To Prevent Further Breaches  59% of respondents said they are deploying more software and hardware to protect their IT infrastructure49% said they are training staff to help avoid further breaches38% are hiring staff to help prevent further breaches.

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Did Somebody Say Malware?

Take an Integrated Approach to Protection  The range of security threats to corporate IT infrastructures is so great that no single commercial solution can resolve all issues. To protect a company, the report recommends IT professionals: be aware of changes in the area of threats and the latest protections against themselect and implement the necessary hardware and softwaremaintain a high level of employee awareness among all staff, not just those whose work is IT-related.

Did Somebody Say Malware?