The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 03-07-2013

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

Deployment Hurdles  44% of IT decision-makers report that it took their companies between a few weeks to more than a month to deploy their latest SIEM product.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

So, Why Do It?  Despite the troubles with deployment, 35% of respondents say compliance requirements are the primary reason to implement a SIEM project.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

Second Thoughts  Cost savings is a major concern. In fact, 31% of respondents say they would consider replacing their existing SIEM for a solution with better cost savings.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

Unexpected Service Costs  Cost savings might be difficult to obtain with a SIEM solution. One-quarter of respondents have invested more than a month in professional services since launching their SIEM solution.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

Managing the Deployment  SIEMs are so resource-intensive that they force companies to assign two or more full-time employees to manage their SIEM deployment.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

Bring On the BYOD  Nearly 40% of respondents say the popularity of mobility and BYOD had the biggest impact on IT risk in 2012.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

IT’s Main Concern  Of all of the IT decision-makers’ concerns, network security is the greatest.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM

SIEMs Have a Reason for Living  Despite the issues with SIEMs, IT staff say that “discovering threats to my IT infrastructure” is still the most important function for SIEMs in 2013.

The Enterprise Has a Bad Case of the SIEM