How to Protect Your Business Against Cyber-Threats

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 01-26-2017 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    How to Protect Your Business Against Cyber-Threats
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    How to Protect Your Business Against Cyber-Threats

    By leveraging behavioral-based detection, machine learning prevention mechanisms and threat intelligence, a company can protect itself against cyber-threats.
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    New Threats Gain Momentum
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    New Threats Gain Momentum

    The types of attack techniques used by cyber-criminals continue to evolve. Between January and June 2016, CrowdStrike observed a more than 600 percent increase in ransomware detection.
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    Attackers' Motives Are Changing
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    Attackers' Motives Are Changing

    In 2016, cyber-criminals used information obtained from cyber-attacks to weaponize the information in order to embarrass targets or influence public perceptions.
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    Signature-Based Detection Is Not Enough
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    Signature-Based Detection Is Not Enough

    Traditional cyber-security tech that relies on Indicators of Compromise (IoC), such as known-malware or IP addresses, can't keep up with changing variants and malware-free intrusions. More than 60 percent of intrusions today do not involve malware.
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    A Proactive Approach Is Needed
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    A Proactive Approach Is Needed

    IoC-based methods are a reactive approach to tracking intrusions. By the time an IoC is detected, the probability that the organization has been compromised is high. Instead, enterprises need to be able to prevent, detect and respond to both known and unknown attacks.
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    Stay Ahead With Next-Gen Prevention
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    Stay Ahead With Next-Gen Prevention

    Organizations need to stay ahead of attacks, regardless of the techniques being used. Machine learning and behavioral-based threat prevention approaches are necessary to fight today's sophisticated threats.
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    Integrate Threat Intelligence
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    Integrate Threat Intelligence

    By integrating threat intelligence into detection and response, organizations can gain a better understanding of adversaries, their capabilities and intentions. As a result, enterprises can build stronger, more resilient defenses.
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    The Power of Machine Learning
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    The Power of Machine Learning

    Machine learning enables an organization to quickly analyze the breadth of data from its network, threat intelligence and other information, leading to faster identification of Indicators of Attack (IoA).
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    Proactively Hunt in Your Environment
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    Proactively Hunt in Your Environment

    Technology can serve as a proactive approach to cyber-security, but as long as people hack, individuals must remain behind security defenses. Skilled analysts hunting on the network give organizations an extra, human layer of protection.
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    The Importance of Scalability
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    The Importance of Scalability

    Organizations can't wait for downtime to scale security to more users or update integrations. Security solutions and capabilities should scale easily. Cloud computing offers new architectural capabilities to help enterprises aggregate and marshal resources to shore up defenses.
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    What to Expect in 2017 and Beyond
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    What to Expect in 2017 and Beyond

    To stay ahead of technically astute hackers, organizations must shift their cyber-security approach to focus on proactive methods—including IoA, managed hunting teams, threat intelligence and machine learning—and unify these crucial elements.
 

With well-funded hackers becoming even more technically astute, long-trusted cyber-security methods are no longer enough to protect an organization's intellectual property, business data, and private employee and customer information. Hackers can change exploit tactics and IP addresses, and can even mutate malware, thereby out-performing traditional cyber-security methods. In fact, more than 60 percent of intrusions today do not involve malware, but leverage malware-free intrusion techniques such as stolen credentials and "living-off-the-land" techniques. "Because of today's advanced cyber-landscape, businesses are swiftly shifting their cyber-security approach to proactive methods for detection and response," said Colin Black, CIO of CrowdStrike, an endpoint protection, threat intelligence and response services company. By leveraging behavioral-based detection, machine learning prevention mechanisms and threat intelligence, organizations can protect themselves against both known and unknown threats. They simultaneously can gain a better understanding of adversaries, along with their tactics and objectives. Black provided suggestions to reduce the risk that your company's employees will become the next weaponized data victims.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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