CIOs Can't Ignore the Workplace Value of Vacations

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 12-16-2013 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    R&R
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    R&R

    55% of organizations offer paid vacation plans. The rest offer paid time-off plans.
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    Enhancement Resource
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    Enhancement Resource

    94% of HR professionals feel that employees boost performance when they take vacations.
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    Happy Place
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    Happy Place

    About nine of 10 HR pros feel that vacations contribute to high morale, wellness and an overall positive culture.
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    Solid Staffing
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    Solid Staffing

    88% say taking a vacation is important for employee retention.
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    Stocking Up
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    Stocking Up

    62% allow employees to roll over vacation days.
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    Wasted Days
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    Wasted Days

    31% say employees leave an average of three to five vacation days unused every year (and these days can't be rolled over to the next year).
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Take the Lead
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Take the Lead

    Clearly articulate that vacations are embraced as a part of your workplace culture. Discourage notions that it's "noble" to forego them.
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Know the Numbers
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Know the Numbers

    Keep track of who's leaving vacation days unused. If needed, have frank discussions about what's stopping staffers from using their earned time.
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Make Them Manageable
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    Best Practices for Managers About Vacations: Make Them Manageable

    Some employees don't take all of their time because they feel they can't abandon projects. Be proactive in planning for project handoffs so everyone gets their time off.
 

Be honest: Do you ever track the amount of vacation time that your employees take? Or is that something best left to HR while you tend to the core, tech-focused functions of your role? While opting for the latter approach is entirely understandable, you must maintain some visibility into whether your IT team members are not taking vacation time. Because if this type of culture emerges as the norm for your department, the fallout could create a decline in productivity, morale and even wellness, according to a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). The resulting report, titled "Vacation Benefits and Their Impact on the Workplace," reveals just how frequently professionals fail to take needed time away, while offering best practices for CIOs and other managers to discourage these anti-vacation decisions. The key takeaway: You must convince all of your staffers that taking vacations ultimately contributes to organizational goals, as opposed to distracting from them. "It is important for managers and company leaders to see the value in employees taking a vacation," says Lisa Orndorff, SHRM's manager of employee relations and engagement. "They should also encourage their people to use their leave, 'unplug' if possible and take a break from the work—even if it's just a day or two every few months." More than 480 HR professionals took part in the research. For more about the findings, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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