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By Don Reisinger

Corporate Software Piracy: 10 Fast Facts

Big, Bad Six Out of all the alleged cases of corporate software piracy in the U.S. in 2010, 49.3 percent originated in these six states: CaliforniaFlorida Illinois MichiganNew YorkTexas

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One fifth20 percent of the software products running on U.S. computers were unlicensed as of the end of 2010.

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$9.5 BillionThe unlicensed software in use in the U.S. in 2010 has a commercial value of $9.5 billion.

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High FinesA company found to be using unlicensed software is forced to pay $150,000 for every software program it has infringed, according to the BSA.

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UnemploymentAccording to the BSA, if worldwide software piracy declined by just 10 percent over four years, 500,000 new jobs would be created and $140 billion would be pumped back into local economies.

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What to do?BSA recommends using a Software Asset Management plan "to ensure the organization gets the benefits that come from licensed software, including reduced security issues and increased efficiencies."

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High riskPeer-to-peer file-sharing sites that peddle illegal software can be extremely dangerous to organizations, the BSA says. For example, one organization had 2,000 client records exposed due to a single employee's use of LimeWire at work, according to BSA.

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Viruses, Trojans, MalwarePirated software often carries with it viruses, Trojans, malware and other issues that could significantly compromise an organization's network security, according to the BSA.

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20 percentManufacturers and distributors were the industry sectors most likely to allegedly use pirated software in 2010, the BSA finds. Those industries accounted for 20 percent of all alleged corporate software piracy in the U.S. last year.

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1 percentAccounting and real estate firms accounted for just 1 percent of alleged corporate software piracy in the U.S. 2010, the BSA reports.

This article was originally published on 06-08-2011