Why IT Pros Are in Denial of Security Threats

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 11-20-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Why IT Pros Are in Denial of Security Threats
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    Why IT Pros Are in Denial of Security Threats

    IT security pros don't regard themselves as potential targets of cyber-attacks, possibly accounting for a lack of cyber-preparedness.
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    Cyber-Attacks of Most Concern
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    Cyber-Attacks of Most Concern

    Asked what type of cyber-attack causes the greatest concern, 67% of respondents named advanced persistent threats, 57% named zero-day attacks and 37% pointed to login attacks.
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    Threat Detection Technologies One Year Out
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    Threat Detection Technologies One Year Out

    43% of respondents say that 12 months from now their technology use would not change and 6% said it would decrease.
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    Consequences of Poor Threat Intelligence
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    Consequences of Poor Threat Intelligence

    60% of respondents said that during the last two years, poor threat intelligence prevented them from stopping at least five security breaches.
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    Adoption of Machine-Generated Intelligence
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    Adoption of Machine-Generated Intelligence

    65% of respondents believe machine-generated intelligence is essential to a strong cyber-defense because current threat intelligence is inaccurate or incomplete.
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    Use of Security Analytics
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    Use of Security Analytics

    Only 36% of respondents say their IT security team uses security analytics. Of these respondents, 64% believe security analytics is essential (19%) or very important (45%).
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    Security Alert Priorities
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    Security Alert Priorities

    64% of respondents would like alert severity assigned by device. 34% say their companies use this approach.
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    Time for Detected Anomaly Alert
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    Time for Detected Anomaly Alert

    34% of respondents say it takes hours to receive intelligence that security analytics has detected an anomaly. 11% say it takes minutes and 6% say it takes seconds.
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    Integration of Intelligence Reports With Other Tools
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    Integration of Intelligence Reports With Other Tools

    The most desirable features of machine-generated intelligence solutions are clear, concise and unambiguous intelligence reports and integration with security information and event management (SIEM) save file and other network monitoring tools.
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    Top Reasons for Investing in Machine-Generated Solutions
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    Top Reasons for Investing in Machine-Generated Solutions

    The top four reasons for buying machine generated tools are: To speed up detection of anomalies: 65%. To speed up intelligence generation: 55%. Accuracy of intelligence: 50%. Reduce severity of attacks: 49%
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    Most Likely Criterion for Machine-Generated Intelligence
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    Most Likely Criterion for Machine-Generated Intelligence

    Companies are most likely to measure the increased ability of machine-generated intelligence to respond quickly to a cyber-attack and prevent loss of confidential information.
 

Half of IT security experts in the United States think their organization is an unlikely target for attack, according to a new study. This largely positive outlook could account for a lack of cyber-preparedness, however, because 61% of respondents also admit that they are not confident their organization can detect advanced threats. The report, titled "Advanced Threat Detection with Machine-Generated Intelligence," was put out by the Ponemon Institute. "This research reveals some major disconnects that IT professionals seem to have between perception and reality. While even circumstantial evidence points to the increasing volume and severity of cyber-threats, it's shocking to learn that half of security pros don't even view themselves as a target," said Larry Ponemon, founder of Ponemon Institute. The Institute finds that IT teams are not confident in their ability to detect advanced persistent threats, but Ponemon said they're not doing much about it. "It's clear that new solutions are needed," he said, including machine-generated intelligence about advanced threats. The report includes responses from 614 IT security practitioners in the United States.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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