Fatigue Cited as Cause of Many Workplace Mistakes

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 02-19-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    48% of surveyed U.S. professionals are distracted by fatigue at work.
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    Error Prone
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    Error Prone

    66% of those who are distracted by fatigue said this has caused them to make mistakes at work.
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    Primary Concern

    When ranked as a workplace distraction, fatigue surpasses more commonly mentioned factors such as personal communications (cited by 35% of professionals) and social media (19%).
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    Fatigue Fallout: Critical Slip
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    Fatigue Fallout: Critical Slip

    41% of respondents said fatigue has caused them to forget items they've needed to do their jobs.
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    Fatigue Fallout: Senior Moment

    24% said fatigue has caused them to address a colleague or client by the wrong name.
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    Fatigue Fallout: Wardrobe Malfunction
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    Fatigue Fallout: Wardrobe Malfunction

    23% admit that they've walked around the workplace with an unbuttoned top or mismatched shoes because they were so tired.
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    Fatigue Fallout: MIA

    21% said fatigue has caused them to miss a meeting.
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    Fatigue Fallout: Extension Request

    16% said they've missed a deadline due to exhaustion.
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    Most Popular Ways to Boost Energy While at Work
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    Most Popular Ways to Boost Energy While at Work

    Caffeine: 66%, Taking a walk: 39%, Listening to music: 37%
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    Gender Breakdown, Part I
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    Gender Breakdown, Part I

    53% of women said they're distracted by fatigue while at work, compared to just 44% of men.
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    Gender Breakdown, Part II

    56% of women said they depend on caffeine to survive the workday, as opposed to 42% of men.
 

Technology has helped create today's state of 24/7, always-on status among workers. And the non-stop connectivity and demands appear to be taking a toll: Nearly one-half of U.S. professionals said constant fatigue is distracting them from doing their jobs, according to a recent survey from Red Bull and Glassdoor. A great deal of employees said this is causing them to make mistakes, some of which are somewhat funny (coming to the office with mismatched shoes) and others that most certainly are not (missing deadlines and failing to show up at meetings). The situation has grown so pervasive that it's considered a bigger productivity distraction than social media. "It's clear that fatigue at work can impact productivity and efficiency, and this is something both employees and employers need to be aware of and address," said Scott Dobroski, a community expert with Glassdoor. "This is a wake-up call for employers to review and assess how to keep their employees engaged throughout the day and make appropriate changes." Nearly 550 U.S. professionals took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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