How CIOs Can Improve Their Staff's Engagement

 
 
Posted 04-13-2017 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    How CIOs Can Improve Their Staff's Engagement
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    How CIOs Can Improve Their Staff's Engagement

    Organizations are recognizing that everyone—employees, teams, managers and executives—influences engagement. Find out how CIOs can make a positive impact.
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    Self-Assessment
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    Self-Assessment

    96% of the managers and employees surveyed said they try to maintain a high level of engagement at work. 96% also said they know when they start to feel disengaged.
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    Corrective Measure
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    Corrective Measure

    78% said that when they feel disengaged, they actively take steps to address it.
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    Who's in Charge?
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    Who's in Charge?

    34% said teams are responsible for fostering a culture of engagement, and 33% said individuals are.
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    Influential Voice
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    Influential Voice

    70% of the managers surveyed feel that organizations can influence employees to take responsibility for their own engagement, to either "a great extent" or "a very great extent."
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    Best Practices: Building Blocks
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    Best Practices: Building Blocks

    65% of the managers said they help their teams take responsibility for their own engagement by building trust and acting with integrity.
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    Best Practices: Power Play
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    Best Practices: Power Play

    48% said they enable their teams to manage their own engagement by empowering team members to make decisions about how to pursue work.
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    Best Practices: Shared Wisdom
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    Best Practices: Shared Wisdom

    39% of these managers said they help teams take responsibility for their own engagement by fostering a culture of collaboration.
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    Best Practices: Road Map
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    Best Practices: Road Map

    36% said they encourage teams to manage their own engagement by setting and communicating clear strategic directions and expectations for their teams.
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    Best Practices: Career-Minded
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    Best Practices: Career-Minded

    31% of the managers said they help teams manage their own engagement by supporting employee growth and development.
 

Workforce engagement isn't strictly an employee thing or a management thing. It's actually an "everybody" thing, with individuals, teams, managers and executives playing a major role, according to a recent survey from the Engagement Institute, a joint venture of organizations that include the Conference Board and Deloitte Consulting. The resulting report, "DNA of Engagement: How Organizations Can Foster Employee Ownership of Engagement," indicates that the majority of workers are taking ownership of their engagement, rather than relying on managers and executives to "make them happy." These professionals said they seek to maintain high engagement levels and, when they sense feelings of disengagement, they attempt to address the issue. To augment such efforts, most CIOs and other managers strongly believe that organizations can help employees take responsibility for their own engagement. Toward this end, they work with teams to build trust, encourage collaboration, support career growth, set clear directions and empower team members to pursue tasks with a sense of autonomy. "Organizations need to take a more holistic view of the way they engage their workforce at all levels," according to the report. "Many organizations have limited success in increasing engagement through employee surveys and traditional action-planning approaches, most likely because these approaches tend to emphasize enterprise-wide programs rather than team interventions which focus on changing the behaviors of employees and managers and the way individuals support each other and work together as teams." More than 1,530 managers and employees took part in the research

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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