Is Work-Life Balance a Myth?

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 12-17-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Is Work-Life Balance a Myth?
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    Is Work-Life Balance a Myth?

    Organizations looking to retain and attract talent need to revisit and revamp their philosophy on work-life balance, according to a Deloitte survey.
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    Team Chemistry
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    Team Chemistry

    66% of U.S. employees are satisfied with their co-workers, while 64% are satisfied with their direct managers.
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    Cool Space
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    Cool Space

    58% are satisfied with their office environment.
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    Mixed Vibes
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    Mixed Vibes

    Only 53% are satisfied with their organization's culture and 50% are satisfied with their company's leadership.
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    Flex Time
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    Flex Time

    67% say they feel comfortable taking personal time off/vacation days, and 62% say they're fine about adjusting their work schedule to leave early or come in late due to personal issues.
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    Value Gap
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    Value Gap

    57% say their manager values them and their life outside of work, but only 48% say the same about their company itself.
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    Boundary Issues
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    Boundary Issues

    32% say they've consistently placed work commitments over family/personal commitments over the last six months.
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    Disclosure Statement
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    Disclosure Statement

    41% say they wish their CEO and company leaders would be more open about their experiences and challenges with respect to work-life balance.
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    Obstructed View
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    Obstructed View

    Only 39% would describe their CEO as transparent on a business level.
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    Influential Parties
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    Influential Parties

    59% say their co-workers have the greatest impact upon their happiness on the job, while 31% cite their direct manager(s).
 

A worker satisfaction survey from Deloitte presents a mixed bag of sentiments: While today's professionals express high satisfaction levels about their co-workers and bosses, they're less enthusiastic about their organization's overall culture and corporate leadership. Findings convey that employers are generally allowing flexibility with regard to work schedules in light of personal issues or commitments. However, a notable number of employees say they're constantly forced to prioritize work demands over family and personal needs. And most do not feel that their company values them, or their life outside of work. "These findings should serve as a wakeup call to organizations looking to retain and attract talent," said Mike Preston, chief talent officer for Deloitte. "Organizations are investing in more and more benefits and perks associated with well-being, like flexible work options and unlimited vacation days, aimed at winning the war for talent. But … businesses can do more to create a culture of well-being, which goes beyond offering generous programs and focuses on everyday behaviors. Well-being is not mutually exclusive to delivering value to clients, in fact it's important in any high performance culture." More than 1,015 U.S. workers took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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