IT Pros Dominate March Madness

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 03-20-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Gaming Interest
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    Gaming Interest

    15% of surveyed U.S. workers plan to participate in an NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament office pool this year, up from 11% in 2014.
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    No. 1 Seed
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    No. 1 Seed

    40% of IT workers surveyed have participated in a March Madness office pool, the highest of any other professional category.
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    Senior Leadership
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    Senior Leadership

    27% of top managers–such as C-level execs, VPs and directors–have taken part in a tourney office pool, compared to 19% of entry-level, administrative, professional staff and technical employees.
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    Money Shot
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    Money Shot

    31% of employees making $75,000 or more annually have participated in a March Madness pool, compared to just 18% of those making less.
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    Regional Preview
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    Regional Preview

    26% of employees in the Midwest have taken part in these pools–tops in the country–followed by the Northeast (23%), South (18%) and West (17%).
  • Previous
    Strange Office Pools: Religious Calling
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    Strange Office Pools: Religious Calling

    One office's employees bet on who'd become the next pope.
  • Previous
    Strange Office Pools: Love Hurts
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    Strange Office Pools: Love Hurts

    Workers from another company ran a pool to predict when a colleague's current romantic relationship would end.
  • Previous
    Strange Office Pools: Biology Quiz
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    Strange Office Pools: Biology Quiz

    A group of employees guessed the number of protein coding genes in the human genome.
  • Previous
    Strange Office Pools: Foul Call
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    Strange Office Pools: Foul Call

    Staffers created Bingo cards made up of common complaints made by colleagues.
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    Strange Office Pools: Game Over
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    Strange Office Pools: Game Over

    Another group of workers ran a pool to predict who'd be the next co-worker to quit.
 

When it comes to participating in office pools for the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament–otherwise known as March Madness–IT workers dominate, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. Typically, employees fill out bracket sheets to predict the winners of every game, all the way through the Final Four and championship. (And, yes, usually there is money involved.) Apparently, tech workers are more likely to enter these pools than any other category of professional, findings show. So, as a CIO, do you perceive of this as a good or a bad thing? Well, that depends upon whichever research you buy into. On the cautionary side, U.S. companies lose at least $544 million due to employees spending time on their bracket picks and keeping up with games/scores, according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas. On the other hand, far more U.S. senior managers feel that these activities have a positive impact upon the workplace than those who feel they're negative, according to OfficeTeam. (Especially with respect to office morale and bond-building.) So, clearly, CIOs need to make their own call here. (And it may help to look up the "rulebook," meaning your company's policies about employees participating in March Madness.) The following are select findings from the CareerBuilder survey. In addition, CareerBuilder has also come up with a number of real-life “oddball” office pools, and we're including some of those here. More than 3,055 U.S. workers took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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