Ten Simple Ways to Engage Your Employees

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 06-30-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Ten Simple Ways to Engage Your Employees
    Next

    Ten Simple Ways to Engage Your Employees

    By Dennis McCafferty
  • Previous
    Unwavering Focus
    Next

    Unwavering Focus

    When meeting with employees, turn away from the computer screen, put away the smartphone and give them your undivided attention. This demonstrates that you care about what they have to say.
  • Previous
    Visual Cues
    Next

    Visual Cues

    Engage by making eye contact and nodding in agreement to good ideas. And don’t forget that a simple smile can transform a tense conversation into an easy one.
  • Previous
    Personal Connection, Part I
    Next

    Personal Connection, Part I

    Address people by their first names to humanize day-to-day work encounters.
  • Previous
    Personal Connection, Part II
    Next

    Personal Connection, Part II

    Take moments to ask employees about their personal interests and–in a business-appropriate way–their families. (Such as how their kids are doing in their sports leagues.)
  • Previous
    Personal Accountability
    Next

    Personal Accountability

    Readily admit your mistakes after a project/task failure. Employees respect leaders who are willing to fall on the sword.
  • Previous
    Pitching In
    Next

    Pitching In

    Never hesitate to say “How can I help you today?” It conveys that you’re part of the team, not just the boss.
  • Previous
    Timely Response
    Next

    Timely Response

    Promptly reply to staffers’ emails, even if it’s just to say “I don’t know. But let me find out and I’ll get right back to you.”
  • Previous
    On Schedule
    Next

    On Schedule

    Show up for team/IT department meetings on time–or even a few minutes early. When you’re late, you send the message that you feel your time is more important than theirs.
  • Previous
    Team Effort
    Next

    Team Effort

    In meetings and one-on-ones, invite staffers to present their ideas first instead of starting off with yours. In doing so, they’ll feel their contributions are more valued.
  • Previous
    Meaningful Gesture
    Next

    Meaningful Gesture

    Be generous with your email “thank you” messages for a job well-done. Then select special moments to send handwritten notes of appreciation.
 

Nearly seven out of 10 workers are disengaged at work–with more than 17 percent describing themselves as “actively disengaged.” Low levels of employee engagement translate directly to attrition–something CIOs can’t afford when tech talent is in short supply. Fortunately, in a section of the recent book, “Your First Leadership Job: How Catalyst Leaders Bring Out the Best in Others” (Wiley/April), authors Tacy M. Byham and Richard S. Wellins introduce relatively easy but effective ways for managers to engage employees. In most cases, they’re based upon the “Golden Rule” principle of treating others as you’d like to be treated. By incorporating them into your daily encounters, you’ll increase the likelihood for ROI-benefiting results: Numerous studies demonstrate that organizations with highly engaged teams are more profitable and productive, with a greater degree of customer satisfaction. “The quest for engaged employees is a mantra at many organizations these days, possibly yours,” according to the book. “It evokes questions such as these: Are people showing up energized and ready to work? Feeling hopeful about the future? Bringing their best effort to the table? … Employee engagement and retention are more than just buzzwords—they’re real vehicles for measuring the health and potential of any company.” The following simple ways to engage employees are adapted from the book. Byham is CEO of Development Dimensions International (DDI), a leadership development consultancy. Wellins is senior vice president for DDI. For more about the book, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login Register