The Last of the Millennials

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 09-03-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    The Last of the Millennials
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    The Last of the Millennials

    There's much to value in the professionals of the near future, and CIOs should not delay in cultivating an environment that supports them.
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    Dollar-Minded
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    Dollar-Minded

    Nearly two out of five high school seniors feel they must make at least $100,000 a year to consider themselves successful, compared to just 23% of current workers who feel this way.
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    Proper Proportion
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    Proper Proportion

    75% of these seniors said having good work-life balance is a defining factor of success, and 71% of current employees agree.
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    Positive Impression
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    Positive Impression

    78% believe that being able to make a positive impact on people's lives is a defining factor of success, but only 47% of today's professionals feel this way.
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    Aim High
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    Aim High

    54% say that "making a mark on this world" is a defining factor of success, compared to 22% of current workers who agree.
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    Set Schedule
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    Set Schedule

    Only 25% believe that work performance matters more than what time you show up at the office, as opposed to 33% of today's employees who feel this way.
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    Acceptable Attire
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    Acceptable Attire

    70% feel that employees should be able to dress casually at work, and 74% of today's workers agree.
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    Upward Trajectory
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    Upward Trajectory

    87% said that people should be promoted every two to three years if they're doing a good job, but only 73% of current employees feel this way.
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    Time Investment
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    Time Investment

    Only 16% believe that it's OK to stay in a job for just a year or two before moving on to better things, and 15% of present-day workers agree.
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    Off-Limits
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    Off-Limits

    Just 13% feel that it's acceptable to check a mobile device during a work meeting, compared to 21% of current employees who agree.
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    Office Update
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    Office Update

    66% said it's fine to check into work matters on a device during a family activity, but just 52% of today's professionals feel this way.
 

Given the lingering IT skills shortage, CIOs must focus on the next generation of employees to develop promising recruitment pools for future positions. In this case, we're referring to high school seniors—who are considered among the last of the Millennials. To lend insight about these young people, CareerBuilder has come out with a recent survey that compares and contrasts their expectations about the working world with those of today's professionals. The results may surprise you: High school seniors express more ambition than current workers, especially when it comes to "making a mark" upon the world. They're also likelier to believe that good work sustained over a couple years merits a promotion. And—contrary to impressions that they have a 24/7/365 addiction to their devices—very few feel it's acceptable to check one's smartphone during a business meeting. But, overall, the survey results indicate that there's much to value in the professionals of the near future, and CIOs should not delay in cultivating an environment that supports them. "With the next generation of workers preparing to enter the workforce, now is the time for companies to adjust their recruitment and retention strategies to guarantee the success of all workers and strengthen the bottom line," said Rosemary Haefner, chief HR officer of CareerBuilder. "While workplace expectations can vary widely among different generations, one thing they have in common is the (need to succeed). Introducing programs that promote learning and collaboration—such as mentoring—can help workers of all generations achieve that together." Nearly 3,040 current employees and 210 high school seniors took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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