Tips on How to Spot Jerks Before They’re Hired

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 02-26-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Conflicting Chemistry
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    Conflicting Chemistry

    83% of IT professionals surveyed said they've worked with a jerk within the last five years.
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    Most Common Types of Jerks in IT
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    Most Common Types of Jerks in IT

    The know-it-all: 30%, The bully: 26%, The complainer: 21%
  • Previous
    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Sinking Spirits
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    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Sinking Spirits

    59% of surveyed IT workers said working with a jerk results in low employee morale.
  • Previous
    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Siloed Effort
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    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Siloed Effort

    42% said working with this kind of colleague results in workers taking on a lone-wolf mentality, as they prefer to work alone.
  • Previous
    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Quality Control
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    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Quality Control

    40% said this situation results in decreased work quality.
  • Previous
    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Dysfunction Junction
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    Consequences of Working With Jerks: Dysfunction Junction

    34% said it results in the inability to get work done.
  • Previous
    Lesser of Two Evils, Part I
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    Lesser of Two Evils, Part I

    48% of tech employees would rather sit in a middle seat on an international flight than work with a jerk.
  • Previous
    Lesser of Two Evils, Part II
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    Lesser of Two Evils, Part II

    20% would rather get a root canal than work with a jerk, and the same percentage said they'd prefer to take a lower position in another department than work with this sort of person.
  • Previous
    Top Workforce Satisfaction Drivers
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    Top Workforce Satisfaction Drivers

    Positive relationships among colleagues: 43%, Office location: 27%, Culture: 15%
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    Personal Confession
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    Personal Confession

    One out of five tech pros admit that they've been an office jerk themselves.
 

The vast majority of tech professionals said they've had the misfortune to work with at least one jerk in the last five years, according to a recent survey from Connectria. CIOs can't afford to take this issue lightly, because a personality-challenged team member can cause declines in overall office morale, productivity and work quality, findings revealed. So, when recruiting for talent, it's key to look beyond strictly tech credentialing to weed out personality types that can bring down the performance and engagement levels of entire project teams. To conduct due diligence, always check multiple references and search for job candidates' digital footprint on social media networks and other sites. While such steps take time, they'll often spare you–and your most valued staffers–from extended grief down the road. "Working with jerks not only impacts employees, but (it) can have a negative effect on the overall business," said Rich Waidmann, president and CEO of Connectria, a hosting company which has launched a site called www.nojerksallowed.com. "Taking a stance against bad behavior, like bullying, can lead to improved employee morale and increased job satisfaction." A total of 265 tech professionals took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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