Why Top-Performing IT Pros Get Lured Away

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 01-13-2016 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Why Top-Performing IT Pros Get Lured Away
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    Why Top-Performing IT Pros Get Lured Away

    With recruitment wars heating up, companies are happy to woo tech talent from their competitors—and even search outside of their industry to connect to candidates.
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    Expansion Plan
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    Expansion Plan

    78% of survey respondents say their organization will increase the hiring of IT professionals this year, with 46% anticipating tech staffing growth of no less than 10%.
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    Hot Jobs
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    Hot Jobs

    75% say it will be either "very" or "extremely" important to aggressively recruit for software app developers/architects in 2016, and 55% say the same about Web/IOS developers.
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    Personnel Problem
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    Personnel Problem

    43% say that the finding and hiring of the right tech talent represents a top concern, and 18% indicate that they greatly struggle to retain IT employees.
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    Greener Pastures
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    Greener Pastures

    27% say tech employees are leaving their companies because they aren't getting paid enough.
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    Next, Big Thing
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    Next, Big Thing

    21% say IT workers are leaving to pursue more exciting opportunities and/or the chance to work with new, "hot" technologies.
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    Intervention Effort
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    Intervention Effort

    53% say they'll try to retain a tech employee if they know the employee is being pursued by a competitor.
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    Top Reasons Why Tech Job Candidates Turn Down Offers
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    Top Reasons Why Tech Job Candidates Turn Down Offers

    Better compensation offers from other companies: 39%, More promising career/professional development through other potential employers: 18%, Better benefits offered elsewhere: 10%
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    Talent Well
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    Talent Well

    More than 35% of survey respondents say their company recruits talent from within its own industry, and 24% say it seeks to hire employees away from competitors. Nearly one-of-five say their organization recruits IT workers from outside of its own industry.
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    External Focus
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    External Focus

    Less than 9% say their company recruits tech talent within the organization.
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    Outside Assistance
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    Outside Assistance

    65% say their company's need for tech consultants this year will either increase, or remain the same.
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    Holiday Cheer
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    Holiday Cheer

    More than three-quarters say year-end bonuses for IT pros in 2015 were higher than the year before, with one-in-10 saying they were at least 11% higher.
 

Organizational leaders say they want to significantly boost the size of their IT department this year—but they admit that they face significant challenges in retaining the tech employees they already have, according to a recent survey from Harris Allied. Many IT pros are leaving their employers for companies that offer more money. They're also tempted by opportunities to work with newer, "hotter" technologies. "Tech professionals are in high demand, particularly in roles requiring software and Web development skills," said Kathy Harris, managing director of Harris Allied. "This demand is giving tech employees a strong upper hand in terms of compensation expectations. But our research has consistently shown the need for these employees to be challenged and grow professionally, while being able to work with exciting new technologies. Employers who take a holistic view of employee retention are better positioned to win the talent war in this very competitive environment." Meanwhile, with recruitment wars heating up, companies are happy to lure away talent from their competitors, and even search outside of their industry to connect to candidates. Ironically, they're less likely to build talent from within (often made possible through internal training programs) to fill tech vacancies. More than 150 CIOs, CTOs, tech managers, IT professionals and C-level execs took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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