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Leadership Void Threatens Global Businesses

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 12-26-2013 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Growing Difficulty
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    Growing Difficulty

    61% of global executives say it is much harder to predict a top leader's success in a new role than it was five years ago.
  • Previous
    Faulty Radars
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    Faulty Radars

    Just 22% describe their company as being very successful in identifying talent early on.
  • Previous
    A Dry Well
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    A Dry Well

    Only 22% rate their organization's future leadership pipeline as very good.
  • Previous
    Be Bolder
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    Be Bolder

    87% say that companies must become more creative and daring when promoting top talent.
  • Previous
    Impact Over Longevity
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    Impact Over Longevity

    78% think that a long track record in a current role is not the best predictor of success in a new one.
  • Previous
    Intrinsic Value
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    Intrinsic Value

    87% say skills and knowledge can be acquired, and that personal traits really make the difference between good and great.
  • Previous
    Change Management
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    Change Management

    86% say that careers will become more disruptive in the future, and that executives will have to take on unforeseen leadership roles and responsibilities more often.
  • Previous
    Challenging Assignments
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    Challenging Assignments

    71% say their potential is best unleashed through assignments that stretch their current skill set and expose them to new and challenging contexts.
 

A generation ago, it was standard practice to fill senior-level positions with lower-level managers who had hung around the longest. After all, seniority ruled. But the rapid pace of tech innovation and economic shifts are changing the game. As a result, organizations must overhaul the way they evaluate—and groom—future leaders, according to a recent survey from Egon Zehnder. One key to success: Prioritizing personal comportment over job-specific skills and knowledge, the latter being qualities that can often be learned. "The world is transitioning to different business models," says Damien O'Brien, chairman and CEO of Egon Zehnder, a global executive search and talent management consulting firm. "Who you are—in the sense of personal character traits and motivation—has become more important than ever. Companies need to close the leadership gap by identifying executives who naturally align due to their personal character and values. Leaders today must win the hearts and minds of employees and this requires a different type of leadership." As for the specific personal traits and characteristics which are the strongest indicator of leadership success? These would include curiosity, insight, engagement and determination. More than 800 executives in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America took part in the research, which was conducted as part of the firm's online executive "Club of Leaders" community efforts. For more about the survey, click here

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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