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Managers Hear Outlandish Excuses for Missing Work

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 11-23-2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Managers Hear Outlandish Excuses for Missing Work
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    Managers Hear Outlandish Excuses for Missing Work

    Some managers verify their employees' excuses for missing work by requiring a doctor's note or calling to see if they're at home. Read these outrageous excuses.
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    Improving Prognosis
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    Improving Prognosis

    35% of employees surveyed said they've called in sick even though they felt fine, but that's down slightly from 38% last year.
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    Excuses, Excuses
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    Excuses, Excuses

    Of those calling in sick when they felt well, 28% said they just didn't feel like going to work, 24% said they needed to relax and 18% said they wanted to catch up on sleep.
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    Fact-Checker
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    Fact-Checker

    33% of employers said they've checked to see if a worker who called in sick was telling the truth.
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    Due Diligence
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    Due Diligence

    Of those who have checked to confirm an employee's claim to be sick, 68% have asked for a doctor's note, 43% have called the staffer at home and 18% drove past the worker's house.
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    Terminal Case
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    Terminal Case

    22% of employers surveyed have fired a worker for calling in sick with a fake excuse.
  • Previous
    Fake Excuses: Family Ties
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    Fake Excuses: Family Ties

    An employee said he had to attend the funeral of his wife's cousin's pet because he was an uncle—and a pallbearer.
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    Fake  Excuses: Global Warming
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    Fake Excuses: Global Warming

    One worker said the ozone in the air had flattened his tires.
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    Fake Excuses: Sweet Tooth
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    Fake Excuses: Sweet Tooth

    Another staffer said he ate too much birthday cake.
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    Fake Excuses: Wild Kingdom, Part I
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    Fake Excuses: Wild Kingdom, Part I

    A staffer admitted that she wasn't sick—but her llama was.
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    Fake Excuses: Wild Kingdom, Part II
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    Fake Excuses: Wild Kingdom, Part II

    Another employee told the boss that he was bitten by a duck.
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    Fake Excuses: Finally, an Honest Excuse!
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    Fake Excuses: Finally, an Honest Excuse!

    A painfully honest worker said she couldn't come to work because she "had better things to do."
 

As an IT leader, you certainly don't want your tech employees coming to work when they're sick. Sure, it may seem noble to soldier on while suffering from high fevers, congestion, coughs or an assortment of other maladies, but that can create more problems than it's worth—especially if one employee infects many others, possibly bringing down your entire department. That said, there are employees who take advantage by calling in sick even when they're healthy, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. In many cases, these staffers simply don't feel like going to work, or they just want to chill out and relax for the day. For some managers, the situation has gotten to the point where they need to confirm that their employee really is sick by requiring a doctor's note or even calling to verify that he or she is at home. And if they discover that the employee isn't being truthful, a number of bosses will go as far as moving forward with a termination. Clearly, fake illnesses can grow into a serious issue. However, to offer some levity, CareerBuilder has also come up with real-life outrageous sickness excuses, and we're including some of those here. More than 3,130 full-time workers and nearly 2,590 hiring and HR managers took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll.   

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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