How to Work Well With Your CMO on Big Data

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 09-16-2014 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Develop a Singular Focus
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    Develop a Singular Focus

    CIOs must demonstrate to CMOs that every tech decision is made in the interest of business-revenue facilitation and enablement, as opposed to being part of a cost-center strategy.
  • Previous
    Get on the Same Page on Measurables
    Next

    Get on the Same Page on Measurables

    Arrive at mutual agreement upon key performance indicators such as revenue generation, usage and retention.
  • Previous
    Define the Needle
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    Define the Needle

    Meaning the "needle in the haystack" of what the two of you will seek within big data, such as business goals, use cases and so on.
  • Previous
    Make It Do-Able
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    Make It Do-Able

    Feasibility reports and cost analytics—with various trade-offs with respect to cost, time and priorities—allow CIOs to show CMOs how realistic a strategy is and what the options are.
  • Previous
    Set Decision Governance Guidelines
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    Set Decision Governance Guidelines

    Be explicit about who decides what, and when. This should include translating data into value, setting strategy, constructing use cases, allocating funds and deploying capabilities.
  • Previous
    Align Communication Approaches, Part I
    Next

    Align Communication Approaches, Part I

    When CIOs and CMOs "talk" in completely different languages, it creates stumbling blocks. Make sure you communicate about IT in clear, everyday language.
  • Previous
    Align Communication Approaches, Part II
    Next

    Align Communication Approaches, Part II

    If you tend to write five-page memos when the CMO just wants a few sentences, for example, include a brief summary and bullet points to make the document easier to quickly review.
  • Previous
    Get Together
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    Get Together

    One company took the step of moving the CIO and CMO's offices to the same floor. At other organizations, the two execs have regular dinners to build camaraderie.
 

Who owns big data—the CIO or the CMO? We know what your answer would be. However, industry research reveals that CMOs view marketing as the natural leader of big data and analytics efforts. So, obviously, there's disagreement there, along with great potential for conflict. It doesn't have to be that way, as long as CIOs and CMOs agree to proceed as co-owners of big data initiatives, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company. Then, once this is established, consider the following eight best practices as adapted from the report to ensure that the two of you work well together. After all, with the worldwide volume of data growing at 40 percent a year, CMOs can't afford to treat IT like a back-office function, according to the report, which is titled "Getting the CMO and CIO to Work as Partners." CIOs, however, sometimes need to "adjust their game" for CMOs to value them as business peers. "More and more, CMOs and CIOs are seeing that they are natural partners: CMOs have an unprecedented amount of customer data, from which they need to extract insights to increase revenue and profits," according to McKinsey. "The CIO has the expertise in the development of IT architectures and the execution of large programs needed to create the company's big data backbone and generate the necessary insights. Historically, though, the relationship has often been a fractious one." For more about the report, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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