The World According to DBAs

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 04-15-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Large Companies Use Hadoop
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    Large Companies Use Hadoop

    66% of respondents using Hadoop work at companies with more than 1,000 people. 60% of respondents using Hadoop run more than 100 databases. 45% run more than 500 databases.
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    Current and Future Hadoop Users
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    Current and Future Hadoop Users

    15% of respondents use Hadoop, 5% are in the process of deploying it, but 60% have no plans to use it in the future.
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    Database Diversity
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    Database Diversity

    Respondents mentioned 20 different relational database management systems, including Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, IBM DB2 LUW and SAP Sybase ASE.
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    Oracle and Microsoft Dominate
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    Oracle and Microsoft Dominate

    70% of respondents run critical data on Oracle. 72% use Microsoft SQL Server. 25% use IBM DB2 LUW.
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    NoSQL Accepted
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    NoSQL Accepted

    MongoDB users in large companies show the acceptance of NoSQL technology. 70% of all MongoDB users run more than 100 databases, 30% run more than 500 databases, and nearly 60% of MongoDB users are in companies with more than 5,000 employees.
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    DBAs Juggle Multiple Databases
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    DBAs Juggle Multiple Databases

    50% of DBAs manage more than 25 databases each. 10% manage more than 100 databases each.
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    Many Vendors
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    Many Vendors

    70% of respondents said DBAs are responsible for managing databases from at least two vendors. 7% said DBAs manage five or more databases supplied by different vendors.
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    Impact of Non-Relational Databases
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    Impact of Non-Relational Databases

    Does the potential growth of NoSQL technology mean DBAs will be responsible for them? Or will a new job emerge claiming NoSQL stewardship? 66% of respondents that had deployed Hadoop or NoSQL said DBAs manage them.
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    Data Challenges Facing DBAs
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    Data Challenges Facing DBAs

    As companies use more data types from more sources, complexity and risk are escalating. According to respondents, the top three challenges for the next three years are: Overall growth of data: structured and unstructured (66%), Improving data security (55%), Implementing databases running on the cloud (37%)
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    Most Significant Technology Trends
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    Most Significant Technology Trends

    The top three technology trends that will have the most impact on database administration during the next three years are: Cloud (64%), Virtualization (48%), Big data (47%)
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    Database Administration Challenges
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    Database Administration Challenges

    The top three challenges DBAs face in terms of basic administration over the next three years are: Need to learn new technologies (54%), Shrinking IT budgets (49%), Need to manage more databases per DBA (46%)
 

Database administrators (DBAs) are at the frontline of data management in most enterprises, identifying and often choosing to adopt new technologies. According to a new survey of DBAs, "While Hadoop and NoSQL are exciting new technologies," primarily large companies use them now and they "do not factor into many companies' plans over the next few years." Furthermore, traditional database management systems remain the foundation for information management infrastructure in most organizations, with Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server the dominant platforms for supporting mission-critical data. To examine the database infrastructure, understand the roles of DBAs today and how their roles are changing, Dell commissioned Unisphere Research, a division of Information Today, to survey database administrators and others charged with managing corporate data. There were 300 respondents from a wide range of companies representing a dozen industries. Two-thirds came from organizations with more than 1,000 employees. One-quarter of respondents' organizations run more than 500 databases.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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