IT Networks Keep Getting Older

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 07-14-2014 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Old School
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    Old School

    51% of all network devices are now aging or obsolete, up from 35% in 2010.
  • Previous
    On Your Own …
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    On Your Own …

    27% are now in the later stages of the product lifecycle, to the point where vendors start reducing support for the device.
  • Previous
    Top Causes of Network Issues
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    Top Causes of Network Issues

    Human error: 26%, Telecommunications failures: 22%, The environment: 15%, Hardware failure: 14%, Asset capacity: 9%
  • Previous
    Relatively Harmless
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    Relatively Harmless

    Only 16% of issues are caused by device failures.
  • Previous
    Power Play
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    Power Play

    51% of all ports support power-over-Ethernet, roughly the same as in 2013.
  • Previous
    Port-to-Port
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    Port-to-Port

    45% of access switch ports support gigabit Ethernet, up from 33% in 2013.
  • Previous
    An Upward Trend
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    An Upward Trend

    23% of access switches support 10-gigabit uplinks, up from 11% in 2013.
  • Previous
    Compromising Situation
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    Compromising Situation

    74% of devices experienced a software bug or security vulnerability which required an identification through extensive lab testing and research, up from 38% in 2010.
 

Today's IT networks are as old as they have been in six years, according to new research from Dimension Data. The accompanying paper, titled the "2014 Network Barometer Report," presents a wide range of tech operations trends, in what can informally be described as a state-of-the-network update. Findings reveal that the majority of devices are aging or even obsolete—and beyond the stage where vendors usually provide full support. This is attributed to a steady, organizational call for budget savings—particularly on capital spending—thus disrupting typical three- to five-year refresh patterns. "Organizations are sweating their network assets for longer than expected," says Raoul Tecala, Dimension Data's business development director for networking. Findings also shed light upon a number of infrastructure and security-related topics. The report was compiled from an analysis of data generated by Dimension Data's four global service centers, in Bangalore, Boston, Frankfurt and Johannesburg. The data was generated from an estimated 290 tech assessments, 74,000 devices and 91,000 service incidents. For more about the research (registration required), click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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