Is Data Collection a Waste of Time and Resources?

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 03-28-2016 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Is Data Collection a Waste of Time and Resources?
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    Is Data Collection a Waste of Time and Resources?

    More than one-third of collected data is considered useless, and if the trend of indiscriminately storing data continues, it will cost businesses $3.3 trillion.
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    Dark Data
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    Dark Data

    52% of all information that organizations worldwide store and process is considered "dark."
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    Redundant, Obsolete or Trivial (ROT) Data
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    Redundant, Obsolete or Trivial (ROT) Data

    33% of data is known to be useless. If collection continues unabated, it will cost organizations $3.3 trillion to manage by 2020.
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    Cost of Data Storage
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    Cost of Data Storage

    For the average midsized organization holding 1,000TB of data, the cost to store non-critical information is $650,000 annually.
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    Untouched Stale Data
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    Untouched Stale Data

    Veritas' previous study, the Data Genomics Index, found that more than 40% of stored data has not been touched in three years and is stale. This year's report confirms that IT leaders know this.
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    Worst Data Hoarders by Geography
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    Worst Data Hoarders by Geography

    The worst data offenders are Germany, Canada and Australia, having respectively 66%, 64% and 62% of stored dark data. In the U.S., 54% of data is unknown.
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    Cleanest and Identified Business-Critical Data
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    Cleanest and Identified Business-Critical Data

    China has the highest proportion of "clean" data at 25%. Israel follows at 24%, Brazil at 22%. But 75% of all data they store is dark.
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    Why Dark Data and ROT?
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    Why Dark Data and ROT?

    The race to the cloud is feeding data hoarding. These behaviors include: IT strategies and budgets based solely on data volumes, not business value. Rapid adoption of cloud applications and storage under a false "storage is free" premise. Employees believe corporate IT resources are free both for business and personal use.
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    Blurred Lines: Employees Store Personal Data at Work
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    Blurred Lines: Employees Store Personal Data at Work

    On average, 26.5% of employees store personal data on their work devices. IT cannot tell which has business value and which does not.
 

While IT and many organizations are in the midst of an unprecedented explosion in data-gathering, a new study finds that only 15 percent of all stored data contains business-critical information. The remaining 85 percent is either dark, meaning its value is unknown, redundant, obsolete or trivial. The reason, according to the study: The data hoarding culture and an indifferent attitude to retention policy. "Understanding and acknowledging that a data hoarding culture exists is a first step in addressing the problem," said Ben Gibson, CMO of Veritas, which commissioned the study by research firm Vanson Bourne. Although more organizations recognize the problem, most do not know what data to start evaluating, what risk it may contain and where the value is discovered, he said. "Once they have visibility into that environment, they can make decisions faster, with more confidence, and bring in other business stakeholders to move forward with a well-conceived plan." The study, "Global Databerg Report," covered 2,550 senior IT decision makers in 22 countries and examined how organizations store and maintain their data.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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