The Key to Battling Cyber-Crime Begins With Users

 
 
By Samuel Greengard  |  Posted 08-18-2015 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    The Key to Battling Cyber-Crime Begins With Users
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    The Key to Battling Cyber-Crime Begins With Users

    Businesses must do a better job of educating consumers and employees about proper cyber-security precautions as a first line of defense against cyber-criminals.
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    Insecurities Rule
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    Insecurities Rule

    84% of surveyed Americans believe their personal information is more vulnerable than it was a year ago.
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    Out of Control
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    Out of Control

    69% of those surveyed Americans think having their personal information stolen in their lifetime is inevitable.
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    No Controls
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    No Controls

    70% have not installed security software on their smartphone or tablet, 62% have not strengthened their Wi-Fi password, and 51% do not change passwords frequently.
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    No Plans
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    No Plans

    89% feel that dealing with a theft or loss of their personal information would be more difficult to deal with than doing their taxes. 61% of Americans lack a response plan for a data breach.
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    Private Matters
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    Private Matters

    38% have a "private folder" on their PC or mobile device that they wouldn't want anyone else to see. Among Millennials, the figure is 57%.
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    Working Dangers
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    Working Dangers

    88% of employed Americans use work devices without trusted company security software.
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    A Matter of Trust
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    A Matter of Trust

    88% of Americans believe that companies often say their data is more secure than it actually is. More than 1 in 3 people feel that companies spend more on a social media strategy than on a data protection strategy.
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    Socially Secure
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    Socially Secure

    70% think it would be riskier to trust a company with their Social Security number than to carry their social security card in a wallet.
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    Risky Business
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    Risky Business

    84% do not frequently dispose of work information that is no longer needed by deleting and shredding documents.
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    Key Takeaways
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    Key Takeaways

    Educate customers and employees about risks and appropriate actions. Use encryption, virtualization and enterprise mobility management to reduce risks. Develop a deeper understanding of employee needs and behaviors in order to build a better security framework.
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    Final Thoughts
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    Final Thoughts

    "The public is aware of increasing security threats but people do not fully understand the risks and what to do if data is compromised."—Alicia Rey, Citrix Security Solutions
 

A day doesn't pass without news of a breach or security lapse somewhere in government or business. As a result, Americans are increasingly concerned about the risks posed by digital systems. Yet many do not follow basic security practices that reduce dangers. A new national survey of more than 1,000 people conducted by Citrix and Wakefield Research found that while consumers expect to have access to their information from any device at any time, the majority have not installed security software of their devices, strengthened or changed Wi-Fi passwords and most have no plan for dealing with a breach or stolen data. Overall, businesses have not done a good job of educating consumers and employees about proper precautions and many haven't built adequate security protections into enterprise IT systems. According to Kurt Roemer, chief security strategist at Citrix, "Educating the workforce and consumers on business security policies is key to creating understanding and promoting governance for trusted information access and exchange."

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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