Eight Ways to Lead During a Corporate Crisis

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 11-18-2013 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

It could be a sudden public scandal involving members of your organization's C-suite. Or perhaps it will be a fire, flood or other natural disaster. Or your company may bring to market a product that proves to be a recall-bound train wreck. Whatever the circumstances, CIOs and other top managers can't afford to ignore the potential of a serious crisis. A recent Modern Survey report, “Crisis Leadership: How to Prepare Your Organization for Challenging Times,” explores this topic in-depth. Along with survey results gauging how well-prepared employees, managers and leadership are (those findings are fairly positive), the paper reveals the following best practices for taking charge during troubled times. While much of the advice is intended for a predominately HR audience, the takeaways are readily translate for CIOs and tech managers. "Crisis management is about being in front of a crisis," says Ronald Thomas, chief human resource officer at RGTS Group, "as opposed to being behind or reactive." The survey findings are based upon research involving an estimated 1,000 workers. For more about the report, click here.

 
 
 
  • Vote of Confidence, Part I

    57% of workers believe their peers are well prepared to deal with an emergency or crisis, and 61% feel that way about their managers.
    Vote of Confidence, Part I
  • Vote of Confidence, Part II

    54% say their senior leaders are well prepared for an emergency or crisis.
    Vote of Confidence, Part II
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Set the Scene

    Test your IT department's preparedness by presenting "what if?" scenarios.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Set the Scene
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Get Comfy Being Under a Microscope

    During a crisis, CIOs have to feel at ease with working while everyone—employees, colleagues, bosses, stakeholders, partners, customers and possibly the media—is watching.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Get Comfy Being Under a Microscope
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Scout for Crisis Leaders

    This would include employees who initiate their own work projects or aren't overwhelmed by unexpected, negative circumstances.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Scout for Crisis Leaders
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Maintain Decorum

    You'll lead your teams much more effectively by speaking assertively and confidently under fire. Save any anger and venting for your out-of-office hours.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Maintain Decorum
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Recruit IT Employees Who Have Weathered Other Calamities

    Ask candidates about the emergencies they've faced—and what they did to help lead their companies under duress.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Recruit IT Employees Who Have Weathered Other Calamities
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Nix the Blame Game

    In the moment of crisis, pointing fingers is a waste of time and energy—and it contributes to a negative and possibly acrimonious atmosphere.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Nix the Blame Game
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Review—and Re-Review—Your Continuity Plan

    A crisis often involves a natural disaster or other circumstance that disrupts tech and overall operations. Constantly re-access current business continuity procedures and systems to minimize the damage.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Review—and Re-Review—Your Continuity Plan
  • Crisis Management Best Practices: Social Sophistication

    Social media can be your best friend, or your worst enemy, during a catastrophe. Always have a designated social-media policy and plan in place for these moments, and train a designated team to take on this responsbility.
    Crisis Management Best Practices: Social Sophistication
 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...