10 Ways Social Media Is Transforming Businesses

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 10-09-2014 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Brainstorm Sessions
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    Brainstorm Sessions

    Managers and employees collaborate on everything from office parties to new customer strategies, thereby increasing the workforce's engagement and sense of company ownership.
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    Identity Recognition
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    Identity Recognition

    Senior leadership—including the CEO—gain direct, immediate access to what employees do and how they feel about daily operations and long-term strategies. Thus, workers are no longer faceless entities in a crowd.
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    Flat Organization Society
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    Flat Organization Society

    Rigid, hierarchy-rooted procedures and policies are dismantled, as the flat, socially adept organization encourages employees to lead.
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    Name Game
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    Name Game

    Once-impressive sounding job titles are becoming relics, as professionals are more valued for their roles and contributions.
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    Virtual Workers
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    Virtual Workers

    No one needs to put in excessive office hours for the sheer sake of being visible in the workplace. When everyone is contributing via social tools and mobility, in-office hours are increasingly irrelevant.
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    It's Business—and Personal
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    It's Business—and Personal

    The lines are continuously blurring between one's private and professional life. You'll find users' business-related social media posts alongside their family and pet pictures.
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    Driver's Seat
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    Driver's Seat

    Job candidates have increased leverage, due to their greater savvy about a potential employer. They're also more knowledgeable about what they can ask for in terms of a salary and other perks.
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    Moving Target
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    Moving Target

    Professionals no longer aspire to be the company employee. Instead, many join the "nano corps" of fluid groups that get a big project done at one organization and then move on to another challenge.
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    All Ears
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    All Ears

    Social media has caused companies to stop talking at customers by dictating product and services delivery and start listening to what these customers are posting about their brands—and corporate reputation.
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    Plot Line
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    Plot Line

    With increased investment in content, companies now seek "the great story" to tell to consumers/target audiences, who are on social media looking to be inspired.
 

Remember when corporations once routinely banned employees from posting comments on Facebook and other social media? That seems like an eternity, as at least four of five companies now either use social media or are planning to do so. Clearly, social media's immediacy, accessibility and flexibility—you can instantly post an industry article, best practices inquiry or company video—establish many benefits with regard to employees and customers. Social media pushes collaboration to the next level, as workers initiate information and best practices-sharing with vendors, customers and, of course, each other. It's a great resource for HR, as nearly all recruiters engage in some form of social media, and roughly three-quarters of organizations have successfully hired a candidate through social media (that's up from 58 percent in 2010). And you can respond to consumer complaints, praises and general observations in real-time, as the ongoing conversation is breaking down the walls that once existed between an organization and the public. In the new book, "A World Gone Social: How Companies Must Adapt to Survive" (Amacom), authors Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt elaborate upon how social media is profoundly changing the very essence of our corporate culture and business strategies. We've adapted the following examples from the book. Coiné is chairman and co-founder of SwitchandShift.com, a blog focused on leadership, culture and change, and was recently named a Forbes Top 10 Social Media Power Influencer. Babbitt is CEO and founder of YouTern, a social community for college students, recent graduates and young professionals. For more about their book, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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