How to Avoid Strategic Self-Sabotage

How to Avoid Strategic Self-Sabotage

How to Avoid Strategic Self-SabotageHow to Avoid Strategic Self-Sabotage

Self-defeating traits can stifle and prevent IT teams from accomplishing strategic objectives—but there is hope for those with counter-productive tendencies.

Insisting on Doing Everything Through ChannelsInsisting on Doing Everything Through Channels

Strict by-the-book policies can’t accommodate the current pace of business and tech changes. Establish best practices while allowing teams members, especially those who combine good judgment with high performance, freedom to make on-the-spot decisions.

Talking as Frequently as Possible and at Great LengthTalking as Frequently as Possible and at Great Length

Cultivate an atmosphere in which participants get to the point during meetings and move on. Repetitive discussions that drag on for hours will dull mental edge and energy.

Referring All Matters to CommitteesReferring All Matters to Committees

Good ideas often die in committees, as the diluting of accountability results in a lack of personalized, take-charge action. Appoint a single person to own every proposal and set concrete deadlines for response.

Bringing Up Irrelevant Issues as Frequently as PossibleBringing Up Irrelevant Issues as Frequently as Possible

Those who insist upon introducing irrelevant priorities, problems and processes will send their colleagues off in unproductive directions. Align all action steps with direct, desired outcomes.

Haggling Over the Precise Wording of CommunicationsHaggling Over the Precise Wording of Communications

In written communications, attention to details matters. But don’t let this paralyze team members, lest the pursuit of perfection becomes “the enemy of the good.”

Referring Back to Matters Decided Upon at the Last MeetingReferring Back to Matters Decided Upon at the Last Meeting

Re-opening debate over decided matters conveys weaknesses in your leadership, while making involved team members feel resentful over being “overruled.” Stick to decisions, but incorporate enough flexibility to adjust to unforeseen events.

Urging Colleagues to Be Reasonable and Avoid HasteUrging Colleagues to Be Reasonable and Avoid Haste

In the old days, “haste makes waste.” Today, haste makes for disruptive impact. So move quickly with informed, calculated direction.

Questioning the Propriety of Any Decision by Asking, ‘Is This Our Call?’Questioning the Propriety of Any Decision by Asking, ‘Is This Our Call?’

Eliminate ambiguity over roles and needed outcomes, so team members are empowered to identify opportunities and act upon them.

Dennis McCafferty
Dennis McCafferty
Dennis McCafferty is a contributor to CIO Insight. He covers topics such as IT leadership, IT strategy, collaboration, and IT for businesses.

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