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10 Bizarre Requests From Bosses

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 06-30-2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    Pass or Fail
    Next

    Pass or Fail

    A boss asked an employee to coach coworkers on how to pass a drug test.
  • Previous
    It Just Gets Worse
    Next

    It Just Gets Worse

    A manager asked an employee to fire a colleague—and then drive the fired worker home.
  • Previous
    Love Stinks
    Next

    Love Stinks

    A boss asked for a staffer's opinion of the profiles he called up on a dating site.
  • Previous
    Shopping Spree
    Next

    Shopping Spree

    A supervisor asked a worker to order items on his personal Amazon account so the boss's spouse wouldn't know about it.
  • Previous
    Camera Ready
    Next

    Camera Ready

    A boss asked a staffer to pluck a client's unibrow for a photo shoot.
  • Previous
    Social Faux Pas, Part I
    Next

    Social Faux Pas, Part I

    A manager directed his employees to "like" his Facebook videos.
  • Previous
    Social Faux Pas, Part II
    Next

    Social Faux Pas, Part II

    A supervisor asked if an employee would be "better friends" with him.
  • Previous
    Morbid Thoughts
    Next

    Morbid Thoughts

    A boss asked a worker to find out how to obtain a death certificate for her deceased ex-husband.
  • Previous
    Dearly Departed
    Next

    Dearly Departed

    A manager asked a staffer to help console the manager's daughter-in-law about the death of her cat.
  • Previous
    Bird-Brained Boss
    Next

    Bird-Brained Boss

    A supervisor asked an employee to climb onto the roof to see if there were any dead birds present.
 

A new survey from CareerBuilder brings good news for CIOs and other managers: Most employees are satisfied with their supervisor's performance, as more than six in 10 workers would give their bosses an "A" or "B" grade. But about one in seven would assign a "D" or "F," findings show. There appears to be a correlation between communication styles and the grades, given that nearly one-third of staffers who interact several times a day in person with their boss assign them an "A," compared to just 17 percent of workers who give an "A" when interacting with their boss once a day or less. "Managers who interact frequently and communicate directly are more likely to have the support of their employees," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "The ideal form of that communication will vary from individual to individual, but everyone's jobs get done better when expectations and roles are clearly defined. The best managers understand the triggers for their workers' success and are able to course correct when productivity drops or conflict arises." Interestingly enough, 22 percent of employees say their current boss asks them to do things unrelated to their jobs, and just over one-half of those workers give their bosses a grade of "C" or worse. To add some levity to the topic, we're including some of the more outrageous examples of those requests here. More than 3,020 U.S. workers took part in the research. For more about the survey, click here.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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