Ex-Employees Still Cause Data Breaches

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Posted 08-22-2017 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Ex-Employees Still Cause Data Breaches
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    Ex-Employees Still Cause Data Breaches

    Ex-employees pose security threats to enterprises that fail to deny them access to applications after they leave the company.
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    Confidence About Ex-Employee Access
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    Confidence About Ex-Employee Access

    44% of the professionals and managers surveyed are not confident that ex-employees no longer have access to corporate applications.
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    On-Site Employees Hardest to Deprovision
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    On-Site Employees Hardest to Deprovision

    66% of the respondents said on-site employees, whether full-time or part-time, are the hardest to deprovision.
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    Work Functions That Are Hardest to Deprovision
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    Work Functions That Are Hardest to Deprovision

    Operations: 26%. Engineering and Sales: 20%. Human Resources: 18%. Finance and customer support: 16%. Marketing: 13%.
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    Time to Deprovision
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    Time to Deprovision

    70% of respondents said it takes up to an hour to deprovision all of one former employee's corporate application accounts.
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    Length of Time It Takes to Deprovision Ex-Employees
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    Length of Time It Takes to Deprovision Ex-Employees

    Longer than a day: 50%. Longer than a week: 25%. Don't know how long: 25%.
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    Half Don't Use Automated Deprovisioning
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    Half Don't Use Automated Deprovisioning

    50% of respondents said their corporation does not use automated deprovisioning.
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    More Than Half Use SIEMs
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    More Than Half Use SIEMs

    55% use a Security and Information Manager to check whether former employees use applications, but 41% do not use SIEMs.
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    Data Breaches by Ex-Employees
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    Data Breaches by Ex-Employees

    20% of the organizations surveyed have experienced data breaches by former employees. Of those, 47% admitted that ex-employees have been responsible for more than 10% of all their data breaches.
 

Many ex-employees continue to have access to corporate applications and often contribute to data breaches, says a new study. Forty-eight percent of respondents in the study, "Curse of the Ex-Employees," are aware of the problem. Furthermore, 20 percent of respondents believe the failure to deprovision employees has contributed to a data breach at their organization. "Companies aren't following very basic but essential security measures around employee provisioning and deprovisioning," said Alvaro Hoyos, chief information security officer at identity management provider OneLogin, which commissioned the study. "This should be a cause for concern among business leaders, especially considering how many data breaches are caused by ex-employees." The solution is to automate off-boarding and to help companies become more secure, productive and efficient, he says. Arlington Research used an online survey to interview 500 non-managers and executives who work in their company's IT department and are decision-makers for hardware, software and cloud-based services. They have some responsibility for IT security, their company creates and deletes employee logins in-house, and they either manage log-ins or are responsible for creating them.

 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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