Book Review: Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing Our Own and Other People's Minds

By Paul B. Brown  |  Posted 03-01-2004 Print Email

Harvard education professor Gardner focuses here on two seemingly simple questions: What happens when we change our minds, and what exactly does it take for a person to change her mind and begin to act on the basis of her new opinion?

Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing Our Own and Other People's Minds
By Howard Gardner
Harvard Business School Press, March 2004
288 pages, $26.95

Harvard education professor Gardner focuses here on two seemingly simple questions: What happens when we change our minds, and what exactly does it take for a person to change her mind and begin to act on the basis of her new opinion?

The implications for providing answers to both questions are huge—for CIOs and for every other executive. By definition, leaders are people who have to change people's minds. And all of us must occasionally talk colleagues around to our point of view, not to mention the need to convince our customers to do business with us.

Given this, is there a proven method of changing someone's mind? Yes, there is, claims Gardner, a MacArthur Award winner whose earlier works have convinced many people that there are multiple kinds of intelligence. His contention, based on 20 years of cognitive research, is that there are seven techniques you can use to change someone's mind. Not surprisingly, they can all work together. The seven?



 

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